Opioid reduction in ambulatory thyroid and parathyroid surgery after implementing enhanced recovery after surgery protocol

Riley C. Lide, Erin Weatherford Creighton, Jessica Yeh, Mikayla Troughton, Blake Hollowoa, Tyler Merrill, Alexa Robbins, Gray Orman, Meghan Breckling, Emre Vural, Mauricio Moreno, Brendan C. Stack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Opioid abuse is widespread in the United States and the risk for chronic use is increased in surgical patients, including patients with thyroid and parathyroid. Methods: Records for 171 patients prior to and 67 patients following implementation of an enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocol for ambulatory thyroid/parathyroid surgeries were reviewed. The ERAS included superficial cervical plexus block, multimodal premedication, and postoperative reliance on acetaminophen and ibuprofen with judicious prescribing of opioids. Results: Post-ERAS patients were prescribed a mean 72 morphine milligram equivalents (MME); pre-ERAS patients were prescribed a mean 163 MME (p < 0.001). 97.1% of pre-ERAS patients were prescribed opioids with 91.1% filled; 68.7% of post-ERAS study patients were prescribed opioids with 84.8% filled. Conclusion: Implementation of ERAS and focus on prescribing practices decreased the MME prescribed and used for ambulatory thyroid and parathyroid surgery. Future steps include increased patient education and tracking pain scores and medication utilization out of hospital.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1545-1552
Number of pages8
JournalHead and Neck
Volume43
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Wiley Periodicals LLC.

Keywords

  • early recovery after surgery
  • morphine milligram equivalents
  • multimodal
  • opioids
  • thyroid and parathyroid surgery

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Opioid reduction in ambulatory thyroid and parathyroid surgery after implementing enhanced recovery after surgery protocol'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this