Opioid antagonist effects on self-injury in adults with mental retardation: Response form and location as determinants of medication effects

T. Thompson, T. Hackenberg, D. Cerutti, D. Baker, Sara A Axtell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

The opioid antagonist naltrexone was administered to 8 adults with severe or profound mental retardation and extensive histories of self-injurious behavior. Five-minute behavioral samples were observed randomly out of every hour from 8 a.m. through 3 p.m., Monday through Friday, for four 2-week phases (baseline, placebo, 50 mg, and 100 mg). During naltrexone administration, there were fewer days with frequent head-banging and self- biting, whereas there were more days on which blows to the head or self- biting were infrequent. Self-injurious participants slept 1.38 hours less per night during baseline, which was unaffected by naltrexone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-102
Number of pages18
JournalAmerican Journal on Mental Retardation
Volume99
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jul 26 1994

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