One health – a strategy for resilience in a changing arctic

Bruce A. Ruscio, Michael Brubaker, Joshua Glasser, Will Hueston, Thomas W. Hennessy

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

44 Scopus citations

Abstract

The circumpolar north is uniquely vulnerable to the health impacts of climate change. While international Arctic collaboration on health has enhanced partnerships and advanced the health of inhabitants, significant challenges lie ahead. One Health is an approach that considers the connections between the environment, plant, animal and human health. Understanding this is increasingly critical in assessing the impact of global climate change on the health of Arctic inhabitants. The effects of climate change are complex and difficult to predict with certainty. Health risks include changes in the distribution of infectious disease, expansion of zoonotic diseases and vectors, changing migration patterns, impacts on food security and changes in water availability and quality, among others. A regional network of diverse stakeholder and transdisciplinary specialists from circumpolar nations and Indigenous groups can advance the understanding of complex climate-driven health risks and provide community-based strategies for early identification, prevention and adaption of health risks in human, animals and environment.We propose a regional One Health approach for assessing interactions at the Arctic human-animal-environment interface to enhance the understanding of, and response to, the complexities of climate change on the health of the Arctic inhabitants.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number27913
JournalInternational journal of circumpolar health
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 Bruce A. Ruscio et al.

Keywords

  • Arctic
  • Circumpolar
  • Climate change
  • Health policy
  • Infectious disease
  • One health
  • Policy

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