On the mixing time of directed social graphs and security implications

Abedelaziz Mohaisen, Huy Tran, Nicholas Hopper, Yongdae Kim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Many graphs in general, and social graphs in particular, are directed by nature. However, applications built on top of social networks, including Sybil defenses, information routing and dissemination, and anonymous communication require mutual relationships which produce undirected graphs. When undirected graphs are used as testing tools for these applications to bring insight on their usability and potential deployment, directed graphs are converted into undirected graphs by omitting edge directions or by augmenting graphs. Unfortunately, it is unclear how altering these graphs affects the quality of their mixing time. Motivated by the lack of prior work on this problem, we investigate mathematical tools for measuring the mixing time of directed social graphs and its associated error bounds. We use these tools to measure the mixing time of several benchmarking directed graphs and their undirected counterparts. We then measure how this difference impacts two applications built on top of social networks: a Sybil defense mechanism and an anonymous communication system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationASIACCS 2012 - 7th ACM Symposium on Information, Computer and Communications Security
Pages36-37
Number of pages2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Event7th ACM Symposium on Information, Computer and Communications Security, ASIACCS 2012 - Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Duration: May 2 2012May 4 2012

Publication series

NameASIACCS 2012 - 7th ACM Symposium on Information, Computer and Communications Security

Other

Other7th ACM Symposium on Information, Computer and Communications Security, ASIACCS 2012
Country/TerritoryKorea, Republic of
CitySeoul
Period5/2/125/4/12

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