On the effectiveness of early generation selection in self-pollinated crops

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Breeders of self-pollinated crops often discard inferior lines at an early selfing generation so that more resources can be devoted to the further testing and selection of the more promising lines. Empirical studies have led to contradictory estimates of the correlation between the performance of lines at early and late selfing generations. Here I examine the theoretical effectiveness of early generation selection. When dominance is absent, the genetic correlation (rG) between the performance of an Ft-derived Fg line (i.e., Ft:g) and a descendant homozygous line is equal to the square root of [1 + F(t)]/2, where F(t) is the inbreeding coefficient at generation t. Dominance, when present, has little effect on rG. The minimum value of rG is high; that is, 0.707 for an F2-derived line. From a genetic standpoint, early generation selection is expected to be effective, but in practice it becomes ineffective if nongenetic effects are large.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1558-1560
Number of pages3
JournalCrop Science
Volume43
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'On the effectiveness of early generation selection in self-pollinated crops'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this