Sobre los caracteres diagnósticos, distribución ecogeográfica y relaciones filogenéticas de Gracilinanus emiliae (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae: Thylamyini)

Translated title of the contribution: On the diagnostic characters, ecogeographic distribution, and phylogenetic relationships of Gracilinanus emiliae (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae: Thylamyini)

Robert S. Voss, David W. Fleck, Sharon A. Jansa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Gracilinanus emiliae is a species of gracile mouse opossum that is currently known from fewer than a dozen specimens. The material we examined exhibits a distinctive suite of external and craniodental characters that are unlike those of any other congeneric species. We review all published records for G. emiliae, several of which are based on misidentifications or lost material, and we report a new specimen from northeastern Peru, the first to be recorded from that country, and the first to be unequivocally associated with primary lowland rain forest. The available distributional data suggest that G. emiliae (or a complex of cryptic taxa with the same morphological characters) is very widely distributed in Amazonia and perhaps also in Venezuelan coastal rain forests. Phylogenetic analyses of morphological and molecular data suggest that G. emiliae is the sister taxon to other analyzed species of Gracilinanus, the biogeographic history of which is likely to be complex.

Translated title of the contributionOn the diagnostic characters, ecogeographic distribution, and phylogenetic relationships of Gracilinanus emiliae (Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae: Thylamyini)
Original languageSpanish
Pages (from-to)433-443
Number of pages11
JournalMastozoologia Neotropical
Volume16
Issue number2
StatePublished - Jul 1 2009

Keywords

  • Amazonia
  • Mammal
  • Marsupial
  • Neotropical
  • Rainforest

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