On recent advances in synthetic biology to enable programming bacteria for biosensing applications

Meghdad Hajimorad, Jeffrey A. Gralnick

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The genetic engineering of microbial organisms offers benefits to society through biotechnology applications. Traditionally, the 'engineering' of microbes to arrive at organisms with desired behavior has not been engineering in a strict sense. It has, rather, required months (more often years) of trial-and-error type of experiments, with the undertaking being more akin to art than engineering. Enter synthetic biology, a burgeoning area since the turn of the century that aims to put the engineering into genetic engineering. Here, we provide a short commentary on some advancements in this field. By relating these advances to recent progress in our understanding of extracellular electron transfer in bacteria, we also provide a perspective on synthetic biology having the potential to enable the programming of bacteria for electronics engineering-related applications such as biosensors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 IEEE 60th International Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, MWSCAS 2017
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages1398-1401
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9781509063895
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 27 2017
Event60th IEEE International Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, MWSCAS 2017 - Boston, United States
Duration: Aug 6 2017Aug 9 2017

Publication series

NameMidwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems
Volume2017-August
ISSN (Print)1548-3746

Other

Other60th IEEE International Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, MWSCAS 2017
CountryUnited States
CityBoston
Period8/6/178/9/17

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
ACKNOWLEDGMENT This work was supported, in part, by the Office of Naval Research (N00014-13-1-0552 to JAG). The authors acknowledge Michael Winikoff, Communications Director at the BioTechnology Institute of the University of Minnesota – Twin Cities, for creating Fig. 3.

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'On recent advances in synthetic biology to enable programming bacteria for biosensing applications'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this