Older women and informal supports: Impact on prevention

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This paper briefly reviews the literature about friendship as an informal support for older women, an at-risk population whose numbers are increasing. Data from an AOA supported study indicate that older women use their friends differentially depending both on the nature and qualities of the friendship as well as the type of help that is required. Friends are more likely to provide help with social-emotional tasks than instrumental ones. Programs should be designed that maximize interaction among older women and those who could serve as informal supports.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAging and Prevention
Subtitle of host publicationNew Approaches for Preventing Health and Mental Health Problems in Older Adults
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages119-134
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781317840718
ISBN (Print)9780866561884
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 8 2014

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