Occupational Training, Unions, and Internal Labor Markets

David H Knoke, Yoshito Ishio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A large majority of U.S. establishments provide formal job training programs, according to the 1991 National Organizations Survey. Most training is directed at core employees (who produce the company’s main product or service) and their managers. But contrary to previous research, blue-collar core occupations receive as much company training as white-collar core workers. The more extensive an organization’s internal labor market, the more likely it is to use formal training programs as mechanisms for enabling workers to advance to positions of higher prestige, pay, and responsibility. The presence of a labor union representing core workers in wage negotiations not only is associated with greater firm-provided training effort, but unions also seem to offset the adverse effects of an absent or poorly developed internal labor market for all types of workers. Unionized establishments are more likely than nonunionized workplaces to provide training to core workers recruited from outside the organization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)992-1016
Number of pages25
JournalAmerican Behavioral Scientist
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1994

Fingerprint

internal labor market
Labor Unions
Organizations
worker
Education
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Negotiating
training program
wage negotiation
Occupations
blue-collar occupation
Workplace
prestige
Research
workplace
employee
manager
labor
firm
organization

Cite this

Occupational Training, Unions, and Internal Labor Markets. / Knoke, David H; Ishio, Yoshito.

In: American Behavioral Scientist, Vol. 37, No. 7, 06.1994, p. 992-1016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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