Occupational Contact Dermatitis in Mechanics and Repairers Referred for Patch Testing: Retrospective Analysis from the North American Contact Dermatitis Group 1998-2014

Erin M. Warshaw, Solveig L. Hagen, Denis Sasseville, Howard I. Maibach, Joel G. DeKoven, Donald V. Belsito, Joseph F. Fowler, Kathryn A. Zug, James S. Taylor, C. G Toby Mathias, Anthony F. Fransway, Vincent A. Deleo, James G. Marks, Melanie D. Pratt, Matthew J. Zirwas, Frances J. Storrs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Contact dermatoses are common in mechanic and repair occupations. Objectives: This study aimed to (1) estimate the prevalence of occupationally related contact dermatitis among mechanics/repairers patch tested from 1998 to 2014 by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group, (2) characterize responsible allergens and irritants, and their sources, and (3) compare results among 3 occupational subgroups (mechanics, electrical/electronic, and other). Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of patients patch tested by the North American Contact Dermatitis Group between 1998 and 2014. Results: Of 38,784 patients patch tested, 691 (1.8%) were mechanics/repairers. Male sex (93.5%) and hand involvement (59.5%) were common overall. Occupationally related skin disease was more prevalent among vehicle and mobile equipment mechanics/repairers (52.7%) and other mechanics/repairers (41.4%) than electrical/electronic equipment mechanics/repairers (21.3%). Overall, carba mix, thiuram mix, and methylchloroisothiazolone/methylisothiazolone were the most common occupation-related clinically relevant allergens. Gloves, automotive vehicles, solvents, oils, lubricants, and fuels were the most common sources of responsible allergens. Conclusions: Common occupationally related allergens included rubber accelerators and the preservative methylchloroisothiazolone/methylisothiazolone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)47-57
Number of pages11
JournalDermatitis
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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