Obesity in Adolescence Predicts Lower Educational Attainment and Income in Adulthood: The Project EAT Longitudinal Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Prospective associations between obesity in adolescence and adult socioeconomic outcomes, and potential mediators, were examined in a contemporary cohort. Methods: Longitudinal data collected in 1998 to 1999 (Project EAT-I) and 2015 to 2016 (EAT-IV) were analyzed for 1,796 participants who provided data at both time points. Adolescents (mean age = 14.8 years) self-reported demographic and psychosocial variables (EAT-I) and follow-up outcomes (EAT-IV). Body weight and height were directly measured. Bachelor's degree or more education, income ≥ US $50,000, and partnered status at follow-up were examined by baseline obesity (>95th BMI percentile) using logistic regression. Self-esteem, depression, and weight-related teasing were examined as mediators using multivariate probit regressions. All analyses were adjusted for race, baseline age, and parent socioeconomic status. Results: Girls with obesity were significantly less likely to have achieved a bachelor’s degree (OR 0.32, 95% CI [0.18, 0.58]; P < 0.001), earn ≥ $50,000 annually (OR 0.57, 95% CI [0.33, 0.99]; P < 0.04), or be partnered (OR 0.45, 95% CI [0.27, 0.75]; P < 0.002) in adulthood. No associations were observed among boys. Among girls, depression mediated 8.5% and 23.6% of the association between adolescent obesity and adult education and income, respectively. Conclusions: Adolescent girls with obesity have lower educational attainment and income and are less likely to be partnered in later adulthood. Depression may partly mediate the associations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1467-1473
Number of pages7
JournalObesity
Volume26
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2018

Fingerprint

Pediatric Obesity
Longitudinal Studies
Obesity
Depression
Education
Body Height
Self Concept
Social Class
Logistic Models
Body Weight
Demography
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • academic attainment
  • income
  • obesity
  • partnered status

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Cite this

@article{f7e2ffb7d2b54f0b82a4ed87275db86a,
title = "Obesity in Adolescence Predicts Lower Educational Attainment and Income in Adulthood: The Project EAT Longitudinal Study",
abstract = "Objective: Prospective associations between obesity in adolescence and adult socioeconomic outcomes, and potential mediators, were examined in a contemporary cohort. Methods: Longitudinal data collected in 1998 to 1999 (Project EAT-I) and 2015 to 2016 (EAT-IV) were analyzed for 1,796 participants who provided data at both time points. Adolescents (mean age = 14.8 years) self-reported demographic and psychosocial variables (EAT-I) and follow-up outcomes (EAT-IV). Body weight and height were directly measured. Bachelor's degree or more education, income ≥ US $50,000, and partnered status at follow-up were examined by baseline obesity (>95th BMI percentile) using logistic regression. Self-esteem, depression, and weight-related teasing were examined as mediators using multivariate probit regressions. All analyses were adjusted for race, baseline age, and parent socioeconomic status. Results: Girls with obesity were significantly less likely to have achieved a bachelor’s degree (OR 0.32, 95{\%} CI [0.18, 0.58]; P < 0.001), earn ≥ $50,000 annually (OR 0.57, 95{\%} CI [0.33, 0.99]; P < 0.04), or be partnered (OR 0.45, 95{\%} CI [0.27, 0.75]; P < 0.002) in adulthood. No associations were observed among boys. Among girls, depression mediated 8.5{\%} and 23.6{\%} of the association between adolescent obesity and adult education and income, respectively. Conclusions: Adolescent girls with obesity have lower educational attainment and income and are less likely to be partnered in later adulthood. Depression may partly mediate the associations.",
keywords = "academic attainment, income, obesity, partnered status",
author = "French, {Simone A} and Melanie Wall and Thomas Corbeil and Sherwood, {Nancy E} and Berge, {Jerica M} and Neumark-Sztainer, {Dianne R}",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1002/oby.22273",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "1467--1473",
journal = "Obesity",
issn = "1930-7381",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obesity in Adolescence Predicts Lower Educational Attainment and Income in Adulthood

T2 - The Project EAT Longitudinal Study

AU - French, Simone A

AU - Wall, Melanie

AU - Corbeil, Thomas

AU - Sherwood, Nancy E

AU - Berge, Jerica M

AU - Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne R

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - Objective: Prospective associations between obesity in adolescence and adult socioeconomic outcomes, and potential mediators, were examined in a contemporary cohort. Methods: Longitudinal data collected in 1998 to 1999 (Project EAT-I) and 2015 to 2016 (EAT-IV) were analyzed for 1,796 participants who provided data at both time points. Adolescents (mean age = 14.8 years) self-reported demographic and psychosocial variables (EAT-I) and follow-up outcomes (EAT-IV). Body weight and height were directly measured. Bachelor's degree or more education, income ≥ US $50,000, and partnered status at follow-up were examined by baseline obesity (>95th BMI percentile) using logistic regression. Self-esteem, depression, and weight-related teasing were examined as mediators using multivariate probit regressions. All analyses were adjusted for race, baseline age, and parent socioeconomic status. Results: Girls with obesity were significantly less likely to have achieved a bachelor’s degree (OR 0.32, 95% CI [0.18, 0.58]; P < 0.001), earn ≥ $50,000 annually (OR 0.57, 95% CI [0.33, 0.99]; P < 0.04), or be partnered (OR 0.45, 95% CI [0.27, 0.75]; P < 0.002) in adulthood. No associations were observed among boys. Among girls, depression mediated 8.5% and 23.6% of the association between adolescent obesity and adult education and income, respectively. Conclusions: Adolescent girls with obesity have lower educational attainment and income and are less likely to be partnered in later adulthood. Depression may partly mediate the associations.

AB - Objective: Prospective associations between obesity in adolescence and adult socioeconomic outcomes, and potential mediators, were examined in a contemporary cohort. Methods: Longitudinal data collected in 1998 to 1999 (Project EAT-I) and 2015 to 2016 (EAT-IV) were analyzed for 1,796 participants who provided data at both time points. Adolescents (mean age = 14.8 years) self-reported demographic and psychosocial variables (EAT-I) and follow-up outcomes (EAT-IV). Body weight and height were directly measured. Bachelor's degree or more education, income ≥ US $50,000, and partnered status at follow-up were examined by baseline obesity (>95th BMI percentile) using logistic regression. Self-esteem, depression, and weight-related teasing were examined as mediators using multivariate probit regressions. All analyses were adjusted for race, baseline age, and parent socioeconomic status. Results: Girls with obesity were significantly less likely to have achieved a bachelor’s degree (OR 0.32, 95% CI [0.18, 0.58]; P < 0.001), earn ≥ $50,000 annually (OR 0.57, 95% CI [0.33, 0.99]; P < 0.04), or be partnered (OR 0.45, 95% CI [0.27, 0.75]; P < 0.002) in adulthood. No associations were observed among boys. Among girls, depression mediated 8.5% and 23.6% of the association between adolescent obesity and adult education and income, respectively. Conclusions: Adolescent girls with obesity have lower educational attainment and income and are less likely to be partnered in later adulthood. Depression may partly mediate the associations.

KW - academic attainment

KW - income

KW - obesity

KW - partnered status

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053466413&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053466413&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/oby.22273

DO - 10.1002/oby.22273

M3 - Article

C2 - 30226010

AN - SCOPUS:85053466413

VL - 26

SP - 1467

EP - 1473

JO - Obesity

JF - Obesity

SN - 1930-7381

IS - 9

ER -