Nutritional supplementation, psychosocial stimulation, and growth of stunted children: The Jamaican study

Susan P. Walker, Christine A. Powell, Sally M. Grantham-McGregor, John H. Himes, Susan M. Chang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

The benefits of nutritional supplementation, with or without psychosocial stimulation, on the growth of stunted children were evaluated. Children aged 9-24 mo with lengths < -2 SD of the National Center for Health Statistics references (n = 129) were randomly assigned to four groups: control, nutritional supplementation, stimulation, and both interventions. A fifth group with lengths > -1 SD was also enrolled. Length, weight, head and arm circumferences, and triceps and subscapular skinfold thicknesses were measured on enrollment and 6 and 12 mo later. Multiple-regression analysis was used to determine the effects of the interventions in which age, sex, initial status, initial dietary intake, and several socioeconomic variables were controlled for. Stimulation had no effect on growth and there was no interaction between the interventions. After 12 mo supplemented children had significantly increased length, weight, and head circumference (all P < 0.01). The effects of supplementation were not cumulative but occurred in the first 6 mo.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)642-648
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1991

Keywords

  • Growth
  • Nutritional supplementation
  • Stimulation
  • Stunting

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Nutritional supplementation, psychosocial stimulation, and growth of stunted children: The Jamaican study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this