Nutrient overlap, genetic relatedness and spatial origin influence interaction-mediated shifts in inhibitory phenotype among Streptomyces spp.

Patricia Vaz Jauri, Linda L. Kinkel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chemical communication among kin bacteria modulates diverse activities. Despite the general consensus that signaling among non-kin organisms is likely to influence microbial behavior, there is limited information on the potential for microbial interactions to alter microbial phenotypes in natural habitats. We explored patterns of interaction that alter inhibitory phenotypes among Streptomyces isolates from distinct communities. Shifts in inhibition in response to the presence of a partner were evaluated for 861 isolate combinations, and were considered in relation to nutrient use, 16S sequence, inhibition phenotype and community origin. The frequency of inhibition-shifting interactions was significantly higher among isolates from the same (0.40) than from different (0.33) communities, suggesting local selection for inhibition-shifting interactions. Communities varied in the frequency with which Streptomyces isolates responded to a partner but not in the frequency with which isolates induced changes in partners. Streptomyces isolates were more likely to exhibit increased inhibition of a target bacterium in response to isolates that compete for the same nutrients, are closely-related or are strongly inhibited by their antibiotics. This work documents a high frequency of interactions among Streptomyces that shift the capacity of Streptomyces to inhibit other microbes, and suggests significant potential for such interactions to shape microbial community dynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)264-275
Number of pages12
JournalFEMS microbiology ecology
Volume90
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Keywords

  • Altered inhibition
  • Interspecies interactions
  • Local selection

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