Nurturing meaningful intergenerational social engagements to support healthy brain aging for anishinaabe older adults

Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory Collaborating First Nation Community

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The emergence of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRD) in Indigenous populations across Canada is of rising concern, as prevalence rates continue to exceed those of non-Indigenous populations. The Intergenerativity Model, guided by Indigenous Ways of Knowing, nurtures a psychosocial approach to promoting healthy brain aging and quality of life. Community-based participatory action methods led by interviews, focus groups, and program observations aid in identifying the barriers to and facilitators of success for intergenerational social engagements in the Anishinaabe community of Wiikwemkoong in northwestern Ontario. A qualitative thematic analysis guides future recommendations for programming opportunities that foster traditional roles of older First Nation adults and support intergenerational relationships. The results of this project elicit culturally appropriate recommendations for community-driven supports that address healthy brain aging. These outcomes are relevant to other Indigenous communities as the framework for determining that culturally appropriate health supports can be adapted to the unique context of many communities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-283
Number of pages21
JournalCanadian Journal on Aging
Volume39
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We acknowledge the Anishnaabek people of Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory as the leading voices in this project. We also thank the community advisory group who willingly provided support and guidance during all stages of this project and the staff at the Long Term Care/Home and Community Care Centre for their dedication to the project and for providing support during the interviews and focus group gatherings. We are also extremely grateful to Elder Rita Corbiere and Elder Phyllis Williams from Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory for leading the translation of this project's abstract in Anishinaabemowin. We appreciate the energy, time, teachings, and consultation that went into translating this work, and also recognize the local language speakers who provided additional support. In addition, we acknowledge the following as fundamental partners in the development of this project: Naandahwehtchigeh Gamig (Wiikwemkoong Health Centre), Waasa Naabin Community Youth Services Centre, Manitoulin Anishinaabek Research Review Committee, Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory Band Council, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and Laurentian University. This work was supported by the Canadian Institute of Health Research (Canadian Consortiumon Neurodegeneration in Aging grant number 37794, 2014 to KJ). Chi Miigwetch, wela'lin, thank you to all those who made this journey possible.

Funding Information:
We acknowledge the Anishnaabek people of Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory as the leading voices in this project. We also thank the community advisory group who willingly provided support and guidance during all stages of this project and the staff at the Long Term Care/Home and Community Care Centre for their dedication to the project and for providing support during the interviews and focus group gatherings. We are also extremely grateful to Elder Rita Corbiere and Elder Phyllis Williams from Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory for leading the translation of this project’s abstract in Anishinaabemowin. We appreciate the energy, time, teachings, and consultation that went into translating this work, and also recognize the local language speakers who provided additional support. In addition, we acknowledge the following as fundamental partners in the development of this project: Naandahwehtchigeh Gamig (Wiikwemkoong Health Centre), Waasa Naabin Community Youth Services Centre, Manitoulin Anishinaabek Research Review Committee, Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory Band Council, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, and Laurentian University. This work was supported by the Canadian Institute of Health Research (Canadian Consortiumon Neurodegeneration in Aging grant number 37794, 2014 to KJ). Chi Miigwetch, wela’lin, thank you to all those who made this journey possible.

Publisher Copyright:
©

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Brain aging
  • Community-based participatory action research
  • Indigenous Ways of Knowing
  • Intergenerational
  • Meaningful social interactions
  • Traditional roles

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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