Nursing practice and global refugee migration: initial impressions from an Intergovernmental-Academic Partnership

V. Bampoh, M. Thongkhamkitcharoen, S. Dicker, W. Dalal, E. Frerich, E. Mann, C. Porta, N. Siddons, William M Stauffer III, S. J. Hoffman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: This report from the field describes impressions of the initial impact of bilateral, multi-sectoral field-based activities undertaken to strengthen International Organization for Migration/United Nations Migration Agency and US-based nurses’ capacity to address complex clinical, social and cultural challenges experienced by refugees in resettlement. Authors comment on the defined and thorough health assessment process that refugees go through prior to resettlement, and focus on the essential nursing role in the health assessment process and continuum of care. The development of the interdisciplinary and collaborative partnership is described as well as next steps to move the partnership forward. Background: In 2017, International Organization for Migration/United Nations Migration Agency and the University of Minnesota, guided by experts from the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, began a unique bilateral Intergovernmental-Academic partnership to enhance the health care of refugees. A key component was to strengthen nursing care of refugees through the standardization of clinical practice and nursing leadership. Sources of Evidence: Listening sessions, direct interaction between International Organization for Migration/United Nations Migration Agency and US-based refugee resettlement stakeholders, patterns in resettlement. Conclusion and Implications for Nursing and Health Policy: The report highlights the potential public health impact of a bilateral and collaborative initiative that develops and bridges key points in the migration and health trajectory of people with refugee status. Separated by geography, context and scope of work, health professionals in different roles in varied worldwide settings with a spectrum of resources may not fully understand the work of each other. Project activities were a platform through which US-based and internationally based nurses established mutuality, reciprocity and equity as partners. By strengthening systems and resources, the partnership reinforces the abilities of nurses who engage in this important work, to optimize health and wellbeing of people with refugee status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational nursing review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2020

Keywords

  • Capacity Building
  • Global Partnerships
  • Immigration
  • International Collaboration
  • Migration
  • Nursing
  • Refugees

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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