Nursing home care: Part I. Principles and pitfalls of practice

Brian K. Unwin, Mary Porvaznik, Gerard David Spoelhof

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Approximately 1.5 million Americans reside in nursing homes. A family physician often leads the interdisciplinary team that provides for the medical, functional, emotional, nutritional, social, and environmental needs of these patients. The treatment of nursing home residents is a dynamic process of ongoing assessment, transitions, and shifting care plans. The clinical assessment of nursing home residents focuses on cognition, mood, disability, skin integrity, and medication management. Advance care planning includes the development of realistic goals of care with the patient and family that go beyond living wills and do-not-resuscitate orders. The nursing home medical record and Minimum Data Set document the interdisciplinary findings and care plan. Transitions between different health care environments are facilitated by communication among health care professionals and detailed transfer documentation. Palliative care encompasses continuing reassessment of the goals of care; general supportive care (e.g., family, cultural, spiritual); and legal planning. Identifying and reporting resident abuse and neglect, and infection control practices are also essential in nursing home care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1219-1227
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican family physician
Volume81
Issue number10
StatePublished - May 15 2010

Bibliographical note

Copyright:
Copyright 2017 Elsevier B.V., All rights reserved.

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