Number of pregnancies, outcome expectancies, and social norms among HIV- infected young women

Debra A. Murphy, Traci Mann, Zane O'Keefe, Mary Jane Rotheram-Borus

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this descriptive study, researchers examined pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), and sexual behaviors among 67 HIV-infected young women, as well as the women's outcome expectancies and peer and partner norms regarding pregnancy. Many of the women (69%) had been pregnant; 42% had been pregnant at least once since leaming their HIV status, with 71% choosing to carry to term, resulting in 25% (N = 5) of the babies infected. The women had positive outcome expectancies related to pregnancy, which were significantly correlated with peer and partner social norms. Lack of knowledge regarding infant transmission, high rates of STDs, and inconsistent condom use all indicate a need for improved intervention regarding pregnancy and decision- making. Suggestions for better methods of providing information to HIV+ young women are provided.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)470-475
Number of pages6
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 12 1998

Keywords

  • Adolescent pregnancy
  • HIV seropositive women
  • HIV transmission
  • Pregnancy outcome expectancies

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