NSF-OEDG Manoomin Science Camp Project: A model for engaging American Indian students in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics

Diana Dalbotten, Emi Ito, Amy E Myrbo, Holly Pellerin, Lowana Greensky, Thomas Howes, Andrew Wold, Rachel B Breckenridge, Christa Drake, Leslie Bucar, Courtney Kowalczak, Cameron Lindner, Carolyn Olson, T. J. Ray, Richard Rhoades, Philip Woods, Tom Yellowman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Manoomin "wild rice" Science Camp program, a partnership between the University of Minnesota, the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College, and the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa is an example of how a communitybased participatory research project can become the catalyst for STEM learning for an entire community, providing effective learning opportunities for grades 5-12 and undergraduate students, elementary and secondary school teachers, and scientists from the reservation, tribal college, and university. Focusing the research on a resource (wild rice) that has important economic, cultural and spiritual meaning for a community, we promote place-based education and support the development of strong science/teacher/community partnerships. Key components of this approach are the Circle of Learning, a conceptual framework that emphasizes trust- and relationship-building between researchers, teachers, students, and American Indian community members, and the Seven Elements of STEM Learning, a pedagogical framework derived from an extensive review of the literature on American Indian education that focuses on a holistic approach to learning that emphasizes the whole student.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)227-243
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Geoscience Education
Volume62
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2014

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