Novel analytic tools for the study of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) in endemic settings: Lessons learned in the U.S.

Julio Alvarez, Pablo Valdes-Donoso, Steven Tousignant, Mohammad Alkhamis, Robert Morrison, Andres M Perez

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Since its emergence in the late 1980's, the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv) has posed a significant challenge to the pig industry worldwide. Since then, a number of epidemiological tools have been created to support control and eventual elimination of the disease at the farm and regional levels. Still, many aspects of the disease dynamics are yet-to-be elucidated, such as what are the economically optimal control strategies at the farm and regional level, what is the role that the voluntary regional control programs may play, how to optimize the use of molecular tools for surveillance and monitoring in infected settings, what is the full impact of the disease in a farm, or what is the relative contribution of alternative transmission routes on the occurrence of PRRSv outbreaks. Here, we summarize a number of projects demonstrating the use of novel analytical tools in the assessment of PRRSv epidemiology in the United States. Results presented demonstrate how quantitative analysis of routinely collected data may help in understanding regional epidemiology of PRRSv and to quantify its full impact, and how the integration of phylodynamic methods as a standard tool for molecular surveillance of PRRSv might help to inform control and prevention strategies in high-risk epidemiological situations. Ultimately, these tools will help to support PRRSv control at farm and regional levels in endemically infected settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3
JournalPorcine Health Management
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 21 2016

Keywords

  • Control
  • Epidemiology
  • PRRS
  • Phylogenetics
  • Production
  • Regional projects

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