Nonprimate models of congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection: Gaining insight into pathogenesis and prevention of disease in newborns

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Abstract

Congenital and perinatal infections with cytomegalovirus (CMV) are responsible for considerable short- and long-term morbidity in infants. CMV is the most common congenital viral infection in the developed world, and is a common cause of neurodevelopmental injury, including mental retardation and sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Antiviral therapy has been shown to be valuable in ameliorating the severity of SNHL, but CMV disease control in newborns ultimately depends on successful development of a vaccine. Because CMVs are extremely species specific, preclinical evaluation of vaccines must be performed in animal models using the appropriate CMV of the animal being studied. Several small animal models available for CMV vaccine and pathogenesis research are described. The discussion focuses on the guinea pig model because guinea pig cytomegalovirus (GPCMV), which crosses the placenta and causes infection in utero, is uniquely useful. Examination of vaccines in the GPCMV and other nonprimate models should provide insights into the determinants of the host response that protect the fetus, and may help to prioritize potential vaccine strategies for use in human clinical trials related to this important public health problem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)65-72
Number of pages8
JournalILAR Journal
Volume47
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Keywords

  • Animal models of CMV vaccine
  • Cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccines
  • Glycoprotein B
  • Guinea pig
  • Guinea pig cytomegalovirus
  • Murine cytomegalovirus
  • Placenta
  • TORCH infection

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