Nitrogen dioxide and allergic sensitization in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Charles H. Weir, Karin B. Yeatts, Jeremy A. Sarnat, William Vizuete, Päivi M. Salo, Renee Jaramillo, Richard D. Cohn, Haitao Chu, Darryl C. Zeldin, Stephanie J. London

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background Allergic sensitization is a risk factor for asthma and allergic diseases. The relationship between ambient air pollution and allergic sensitization is unclear. Objective To investigate the relationship between ambient air pollution and allergic sensitization in a nationally representative sample of the US population. Methods We linked annual average concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), particulate matter ≤10 μm (PM 10), particulate matter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5), and summer concentrations of ozone (O3), to allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) data for participants in the 2005-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). In addition to the monitor-based air pollution estimates, we used the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model to increase the representation of rural participants in our sample. Logistic regression with population-based sampling weights was used to calculate adjusted prevalence odds ratios per 10 ppb increase in O3 and NO2, per 10 μg/m3 increase in PM10, and per 5 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 adjusting for race, gender, age, socioeconomic status, smoking, and urban/rural status. Results Using CMAQ data, increased levels of NO2 were associated with positive IgE to any (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.04, 1.27), inhalant (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.02, 1.33), and indoor (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.03, 1.31) allergens. Higher PM2.5 levels were associated with positivity to indoor allergen-specific IgE (OR 1.24, 95% CI 1.13, 1.36). Effect estimates were similar using monitored data. Conclusions Increased ambient NO2 was consistently associated with increased prevalence of allergic sensitization.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1763-1772
Number of pages10
JournalRespiratory Medicine
Volume107
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2013

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported in part by Division of Health Studies Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, and the Division of Intramural Research, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, NIH, DHHS. The findings and conclusions in this article are those of the authors and do not represent the views of the National Center for Environmental Health/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry or National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.

Keywords

  • Air pollution
  • Allergic
  • Epidemiology
  • IgE
  • NHANES
  • Sensitization

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