News coverage and online advertising effects on patient-led search for aspirin, heart health, and stroke information and educational tool use

Brian G. Southwell, Milton Eder, John Finnegan, Russell V Luepker, Sue Duval, Carol Russell, Robert N. Graves, Adele Namboodri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Using indicators of campaign effort and relevant news stories, we sought to predict two patterns of patient behavior regarding information about aspirin and heart health: patient use of a campaign web tool to determine whether they should talk with a physician about using aspirin and patient searches for information about aspirin and the heart. Methods: We used ARIMA modeling to predict two time series as a function of independent variables. Results: We found significant prediction of time series in both models, but campaign expenditure only predicted use of a campaign web tool whereas weekly news stories predicted online searches regarding aspirin and the heart originating from Minnesota. Conclusion: Patient information engagement is a function of information salience at least in part. Campaign advertising expenditure can prompt audience use of campaign tools but news coverage also operates as an important force on patient search behavior. Practice Implications: Health promotion professionals charged with reaching patients with heart health and stroke prevention messages should monitor news coverage as a potential complementary or rival force while at the same time promoting campaign-related information online.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPatient Education and Counseling
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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