New approach to effective biopulping: Treating logs with Phlebiopsis gigantea

Robert A. Blanchette, Chad D. Behrendt, Diane Williams, Sara Iverson, Masood Akhtar, Scott A. Enebak

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Phlebiopsis gigantea is an aggressive white-rot fungus that colonizes conifer wood. It is ideally suited for bioprocessing because of its fast growth, prolific asexual spore production and benefits from controlling sapstain, reducing pitch and potential improvements for pulp and paper production. Field investigations in Alabama and Minnesota using red and loblolly pine logs showed the fungus was able to successfully colonize fresh sapwood and inhibit detrimental sapstain fungi. Treated logs had significantly reduced amounts of pitch (61% less) and bark removal was facilitated. Mechanically refined fibers from treated logs had increased cell wall porosity and reduced energy consumption (9 to 27% less) as compared to control logs. Paper made from pretreated wood also resulted in increases in burst, tear, and tensile strength properties.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PagesA51-A53
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998
EventProceedings of the 1998 7th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry. Part 1 (of 3) - Vancouver, Can
Duration: Jun 16 1998Jun 19 1998

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 7th International Conference on Biotechnology in the Pulp and Paper Industry. Part 1 (of 3)
CityVancouver, Can
Period6/16/986/19/98

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