Neuropsychological aspects for evaluating learning disabilities

Margaret Semrud-Clikeman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

65 Scopus citations

Abstract

This review surveys the empirical literature for assessments of learning problems in children from a neuropsychological perspective. An evaluation of children with learning problems must consider measures of working memory, attention, executive function, and comprehension (listening and written), particularly for children who do not respond to intervention. These constructs must be tied to intervention techniques, and their connections must be empirically verified. The response-to-intervention (RTI) perspective provides excellent support for the process in young children but is still developing the process for students above the second grade. This review provides information about the existing research on neurobiological correlates of learning disabilities, possible areas for further evaluation, and the link to the RTI movement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-568
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Learning Disabilities
Volume38
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Neuropsychological aspects for evaluating learning disabilities'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this