Network topology changes in chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)

Elias Boroda, Michael Armstrong, Casey S. Gilmore, Carrie Gentz, Alicia Fenske, Mark Fiecas, Tim Hendrickson, Donovan Roediger, Bryon Mueller, Randy Kardon, Kelvin Lim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: In mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), diffuse axonal injury results in disruption of functional networks in the brain and is thought to be a major contributor to cognitive dysfunction even years after trauma. Objective: Few studies have assessed longitudinal changes in network topology in chronic mTBI. We utilized a graph theoretical approach to investigate alterations in global network topology based on resting-state functional connectivity in veterans with chronic mTBI. Methods: 50 veterans with chronic mTBI (mean of 20.7 yrs. from trauma) and 40 age-matched controls underwent two functional magnetic resonance imaging scans 18 months apart. Graph theory analysis was used to quantify network topology measures (density, clustering coefficient, global efficiency, and modularity). Hierarchical linear mixed models were used to examine longitudinal change in network topology. Results: With all network measures, we found a significant group × time interaction. At baseline, brain networks of individuals with mTBI were less clustered (p = 0.03) and more modular (p = 0.02) than those of HC. Over time, the mTBI networks became more densely connected (p = 0.002), with increased clustering (p = 0.001) and reduced modularity (p < 0.001). Network topology did not change across time in HC. Conclusion: These findings demonstrate that brain networks of individuals with mTBI remain plastic decades after injury and undergo significant changes in network topology even at the later phase of the disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number102691
JournalNeuroImage: Clinical
Volume31
Early online dateMay 5 2021
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by grant funding from the Department of Defense, Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium (CENC) Award W81XWH-13-2-0095 and Department of Veterans Affairs CENC Award I01 CX001135, the Iowa City VA Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Visual Loss funded by Department of Veterans Affairs (RR&D) grant C9251-C (RX003002), and by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC). The authors report no conflicts of interest. The authors had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this article are those of the authors and should not be construed as an official Veterans Affairs or Department of Defense position, policy, or decision, unless so designated by other official documentation.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by grant funding from the Department of Defense, Chronic Effects of Neurotrauma Consortium (CENC) Award W81XWH-13-2-0095 and Department of Veterans Affairs CENC Award I01 CX001135, the Iowa City VA Center for the Prevention and Treatment of Visual Loss funded by Department of Veterans Affairs (RR&D) grant C9251-C (RX003002), and by the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC). The authors report no conflicts of interest. The authors had full access to all the data in the study and take responsibility for the integrity of the data and the accuracy of the data analysis. The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this article are those of the authors and should not be construed as an official Veterans Affairs or Department of Defense position, policy, or decision, unless so designated by other official documentation.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Authors

Keywords

  • Graph theory
  • TBI
  • fMRI
  • Brain/diagnostic imaging
  • Magnetic Resonance Imaging
  • Brain Concussion/diagnostic imaging
  • Brain Injuries
  • Humans
  • Brain Mapping
  • Infant

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Network topology changes in chronic mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this