Neonicotinoid seed treatments for managing potato leafhopper infestations in snap bean

Brian A. Nault, Alan G. Taylor, Michael Urwiler, Tom Rabaey, William D Hutchison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

70 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thiamethoxam- and imidacloprid-treated seed were evaluated for controlling infestations of potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris), in snap bean in Minnesota in 2001 and in New York and Illinois in 2002. Efficacy of these seed treatments was assessed by rating leafhopper damage to foliage or by monitoring densities of nymphs through the season in small field plots. Thiamethoxam provided longer and more consistent protection of the crop from leafhoppers than imidacloprid. In thiamethoxam-treated plots, there was no damage to foliage and densities of nymphs were maintained below economically damaging levels from the seedling stage through bloom. Thiamethoxam at a rate of 30g (a.i.)/100kg of seed controlled leafhoppers for 31d to over 38d. Additionally, as the rate of thiamethoxam increased, the duration of protection also increased. In contrast, imidacloprid at a rate of 60g (a.i.)/100kg of seed protected early growth stages of the crop from leafhoppers in only 1 of 4 plantings. Snap bean seed treated with thiamethoxam will provide growers with an option for controlling potato leafhoppers that is safer and more environmentally friendly than using soil-applied, systemic organophosphate insecticides such as disulfoton or phorate. Furthermore, difficulty associated with properly timing foliar sprays, inadequate coverage and reduced efficacy often encountered when treating young snap bean plants are avoided using seed treatments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-154
Number of pages8
JournalCrop Protection
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2004

Fingerprint

Empoasca fabae
thiamethoxam
neonicotinoid insecticides
green beans
seed treatment
Cicadellidae
imidacloprid
seeds
nymphs
disulfoton
spray coverage
phorate
organophosphorus insecticides
plant protection
leaves
growers
developmental stages
planting
duration
seedlings

Keywords

  • Empoasca fabae
  • Imidacloprid
  • Management
  • Phaseolus vulgaris
  • Thiamethoxam

Cite this

Neonicotinoid seed treatments for managing potato leafhopper infestations in snap bean. / Nault, Brian A.; Taylor, Alan G.; Urwiler, Michael; Rabaey, Tom; Hutchison, William D.

In: Crop Protection, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.01.2004, p. 147-154.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nault, Brian A. ; Taylor, Alan G. ; Urwiler, Michael ; Rabaey, Tom ; Hutchison, William D. / Neonicotinoid seed treatments for managing potato leafhopper infestations in snap bean. In: Crop Protection. 2004 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 147-154.
@article{d2576cca58c8415ab95d785678c31a31,
title = "Neonicotinoid seed treatments for managing potato leafhopper infestations in snap bean",
abstract = "Thiamethoxam- and imidacloprid-treated seed were evaluated for controlling infestations of potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris), in snap bean in Minnesota in 2001 and in New York and Illinois in 2002. Efficacy of these seed treatments was assessed by rating leafhopper damage to foliage or by monitoring densities of nymphs through the season in small field plots. Thiamethoxam provided longer and more consistent protection of the crop from leafhoppers than imidacloprid. In thiamethoxam-treated plots, there was no damage to foliage and densities of nymphs were maintained below economically damaging levels from the seedling stage through bloom. Thiamethoxam at a rate of 30g (a.i.)/100kg of seed controlled leafhoppers for 31d to over 38d. Additionally, as the rate of thiamethoxam increased, the duration of protection also increased. In contrast, imidacloprid at a rate of 60g (a.i.)/100kg of seed protected early growth stages of the crop from leafhoppers in only 1 of 4 plantings. Snap bean seed treated with thiamethoxam will provide growers with an option for controlling potato leafhoppers that is safer and more environmentally friendly than using soil-applied, systemic organophosphate insecticides such as disulfoton or phorate. Furthermore, difficulty associated with properly timing foliar sprays, inadequate coverage and reduced efficacy often encountered when treating young snap bean plants are avoided using seed treatments.",
keywords = "Empoasca fabae, Imidacloprid, Management, Phaseolus vulgaris, Thiamethoxam",
author = "Nault, {Brian A.} and Taylor, {Alan G.} and Michael Urwiler and Tom Rabaey and Hutchison, {William D}",
year = "2004",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.cropro.2003.08.002",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "147--154",
journal = "Crop Protection",
issn = "0261-2194",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Neonicotinoid seed treatments for managing potato leafhopper infestations in snap bean

AU - Nault, Brian A.

AU - Taylor, Alan G.

AU - Urwiler, Michael

AU - Rabaey, Tom

AU - Hutchison, William D

PY - 2004/1/1

Y1 - 2004/1/1

N2 - Thiamethoxam- and imidacloprid-treated seed were evaluated for controlling infestations of potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris), in snap bean in Minnesota in 2001 and in New York and Illinois in 2002. Efficacy of these seed treatments was assessed by rating leafhopper damage to foliage or by monitoring densities of nymphs through the season in small field plots. Thiamethoxam provided longer and more consistent protection of the crop from leafhoppers than imidacloprid. In thiamethoxam-treated plots, there was no damage to foliage and densities of nymphs were maintained below economically damaging levels from the seedling stage through bloom. Thiamethoxam at a rate of 30g (a.i.)/100kg of seed controlled leafhoppers for 31d to over 38d. Additionally, as the rate of thiamethoxam increased, the duration of protection also increased. In contrast, imidacloprid at a rate of 60g (a.i.)/100kg of seed protected early growth stages of the crop from leafhoppers in only 1 of 4 plantings. Snap bean seed treated with thiamethoxam will provide growers with an option for controlling potato leafhoppers that is safer and more environmentally friendly than using soil-applied, systemic organophosphate insecticides such as disulfoton or phorate. Furthermore, difficulty associated with properly timing foliar sprays, inadequate coverage and reduced efficacy often encountered when treating young snap bean plants are avoided using seed treatments.

AB - Thiamethoxam- and imidacloprid-treated seed were evaluated for controlling infestations of potato leafhopper, Empoasca fabae (Harris), in snap bean in Minnesota in 2001 and in New York and Illinois in 2002. Efficacy of these seed treatments was assessed by rating leafhopper damage to foliage or by monitoring densities of nymphs through the season in small field plots. Thiamethoxam provided longer and more consistent protection of the crop from leafhoppers than imidacloprid. In thiamethoxam-treated plots, there was no damage to foliage and densities of nymphs were maintained below economically damaging levels from the seedling stage through bloom. Thiamethoxam at a rate of 30g (a.i.)/100kg of seed controlled leafhoppers for 31d to over 38d. Additionally, as the rate of thiamethoxam increased, the duration of protection also increased. In contrast, imidacloprid at a rate of 60g (a.i.)/100kg of seed protected early growth stages of the crop from leafhoppers in only 1 of 4 plantings. Snap bean seed treated with thiamethoxam will provide growers with an option for controlling potato leafhoppers that is safer and more environmentally friendly than using soil-applied, systemic organophosphate insecticides such as disulfoton or phorate. Furthermore, difficulty associated with properly timing foliar sprays, inadequate coverage and reduced efficacy often encountered when treating young snap bean plants are avoided using seed treatments.

KW - Empoasca fabae

KW - Imidacloprid

KW - Management

KW - Phaseolus vulgaris

KW - Thiamethoxam

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0742288650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0742288650&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.cropro.2003.08.002

DO - 10.1016/j.cropro.2003.08.002

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0742288650

VL - 23

SP - 147

EP - 154

JO - Crop Protection

JF - Crop Protection

SN - 0261-2194

IS - 2

ER -