Neighborhood socioeconomic context and change in allostatic load among older Puerto Ricans: The Boston Puerto Rican health study

Marcia P. Jiménez, Theresa L. Osypuk, Sandra Arevalo, Katherine L. Tucker, Luis M. Falcon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neighborhood context may influence health and health disparities. However, most studies have been constrained by cross-sectional designs that limit causal inference due to failing to establish temporal order of exposure and disease. We tested the impact of baseline neighborhood context (neighborhood socioeconomic status factor at the block-group level, and relative income of individuals compared to their neighbors) on allostatic load two years later. We leveraged data from the Boston Puerto Rican Health Study, a prospective cohort of aging Puerto Rican adults (aged 45-75 at baseline), with change in AL modeled between baseline and the 2nd wave of follow-up using two-level hierarchical linear regression models. Puerto Rican adults with higher income, relative to their neighbors, exhibited lower AL after two years, after adjusting for NSES, age, gender, individual-level SES, length of residence, and city. After additional control for baseline AL, this association was attenuated to marginal significance. We found no significant association of NSES with AL. Longitudinal designs are an important tool to understand how neighborhood contexts influence health and health disparities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalHealth and Place
Volume33
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

    Fingerprint

Keywords

  • Allostatic load
  • Neighborhood context
  • Puerto ricans
  • Relative income

Cite this