Neighborhood Collective Efficacy: A Longitudinal Social Determinant of Access to Medical Care Among Recently Immigrated Latina Young Adults

Blair K. Puleo, Frank R. Dillon, Melissa M. Ertl, Nicole Da Silva, Yajaira A. Cabrera Tineo, Michael Verile, Mario De La Rosa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The present longitudinal study examined changes in perceived access to health care among a recently immigrated cohort of Latina young adults who were assessed annually during their first 3 years in the United States. A parallel process growth model of perceived access to health care and neighborhood collective efficacy was examined, accounting for socioeconomic indicators and immigration status. Five hundred thirty Latina young adults (ages 18–23) participated at baseline assessment, and approximately 95% were retained over three annual assessment time points. Participants’ mean level of perceived access to health care increased during their initial 3 years in the United States. Women who reported more of an increase in perceived access to health care tended to also indicate increased neighborhood collective efficacy relative to their peers during their first 3 years in the United States. Findings offer important information about the individual- and community-level factors that influence recently immigrated Latinas’ health care access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHispanic Health Care International
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2023
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© The Author(s) 2023.

Keywords

  • Latina women
  • access to health care
  • health disparities
  • neighborhood collective efficacy
  • social and cultural determinants

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

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