Negative emotions and alcohol use disorder treatment

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

We review the association of negative emotions and alcohol use disorder (AUD) through the lens of three discrete disciplines: psychology, psychiatry, and neuroscience. Taking an integrative view of these models and related findings we conclude that: (1) drinking to cope (DTC) serves as the primary final common pathway linking negative emotions to AUD; (2) the quantity rather than the quality of negative emotions modulate their association to drinking and AUD; (3) chronic alcohol use is a neurobiological insult that can dysregulate mood/stress systems leading to a cycle of escalating negative emotions and DTC; (4) preaddiction chronic/traumatic stress or psychiatric disorder constitutes a neurobiological vulnerability to develop a cycle of escalating negative emotions and DTC; (5) increased risk for relapse among those with preaddiction chronic/traumatic stress or psychiatric disorder likely marks a retarded neurobiological re-regulation of stress-mood systems during abstinence; (6) standard psychiatric treatments for anxiety and depression with comorbid AUD improves the former, but only minimally affects the latter; and (7) cognitive-behavioral treatment explicitly focused on reducing DTC and pharmacological treatment targeting neurobiological stress systems show promise in improving AUD associated with strong negative emotions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationNeuroscience of Alcohol
Subtitle of host publicationMechanisms and Treatment
PublisherElsevier
Pages613-621
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9780128131251
ISBN (Print)9780128131268
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • Alcohol use disorder
  • Allostasis
  • Anxiety
  • Comorbidity
  • Depression
  • Drinking to cope
  • Negative affect
  • Negative emotions
  • Opponent process
  • Stress

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