Natural rodent model of viral transmission reveals biological features of virus population dynamics

Elizabeth J Fay, Keir M. Balla, Shanley N Roach, Frances K. Shepherd, Dira Putri, Talia D Wiggen, Stephen A. Goldstein, Mark J Pierson, Martin T. Ferris, Claire E. Thefaine, Andrew Tucker, Mark Salnikov, Valerie Cortez, Susan R. Compton, Sergei V. Kotenko, Ryan C Hunter, David Masopust, Nels C. Elde, Ryan A. Langlois

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Emerging viruses threaten global health, but few experimental models can characterize the virus and host factors necessary for within- and cross-species transmission. Here, we leverage a model whereby pet store mice or rats-which harbor natural rodent pathogens-are cohoused with laboratory mice. This "dirty"mouse model offers a platform for studying acute transmission of viruses between and within hosts via natural mechanisms. We identified numerous viruses and other microbial species that transmit to cohoused mice, including prospective new members of the Coronaviridae, Astroviridae, Picornaviridae, and Narnaviridae families, and uncovered pathogen interactions that promote or prevent virus transmission. We also evaluated transmission dynamics ofmurine astroviruses during transmission and spread within a new host. Finally, by cohousing our laboratory mice with the bedding of pet store rats, we identified cross-species transmission of a rat astrovirus. Overall, this model system allows for the analysis of transmission of natural rodent viruses and is a platform to further characterize barriers to zoonosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere20211220
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume219
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 27 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health R01 AI132962 and an Academic Investment Research Program grant from the University of Minnesota Medical School to R.A. Lan-glois. E.J. Fay was supported by National Institutes of Health T32 AI007313. K.M. Balla was supported by National Institutes of Health T32 AI055434-13. S.N. Roach and F.K. Shepherd were supported by National Institutes of Health T32 HL007741. M.T. Ferris was supported by National Institutes of Health U19 AI100625.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Fay et al.

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Natural rodent model of viral transmission reveals biological features of virus population dynamics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this