Nativity, ethnicity, and residential relocation: The experience of hmong refugees and african americans displaced from public housing

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Abstract

This article focuses on how the experiences of refugee public housing residents differ from those of other public housing residents when they participate in housing dispersal programs. An analysis of the spatial resettlement patterns and survey responses of Hmong and African-American public housing residents who were involuntarily relocated from public housing in Minneapolis, MN indicates the extent to which residents resettled in ethnically concentrated neighborhoods and their satisfaction with their new housing arrangements and neighborhoods. Research results suggest that Hmong did not settle in ethnically concentrated neighborhoods to the same extent as African Americans after relocation, and experienced lower levels of satisfaction in their new housing arrangements and neighborhoods. These findings indicate that the outcomes for residents involved in housing dispersal programs may depend in part on nativity status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)321-344
Number of pages24
JournalJournal of Urban Affairs
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2010

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