National Cancer Institute, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute/Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation Consortium First International Consensus Conference on Late Effects after Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: The Need for Pediatric-Specific Long-Term Follow-up Guidelines

Michael A. Pulsipher, Roderick Skinner, George B. McDonald, Sangeeta Hingorani, Saro H. Armenian, Kenneth R. Cooke, Clarisa Gracia, Anna Petryk, Smita Bhatia, Nancy Bunin, Michael L. Nieder, Christopher C. Dvorak, Lillian Sung, Jean E. Sanders, Joanne Kurtzberg, K. Scott Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

62 Scopus citations

Abstract

Existing standards for screening and management of late effects occurring in children who have undergone hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) include recommendations from pediatric cancer networks and consensus guidelines from adult-oriented transplantation societies applicable to all HCT recipients. Although these approaches have significant merit, they are not pediatric HCT-focused, and they do not address post-HCT challenges faced by children with complex nonmalignant disorders. In this article we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of current published recommendations and conclude that pediatric-specific guidelines for post-HCT screening and management would be beneficial to the long-term health of these patients and would promote late effects research in this field. Our panel of late effects experts also provides recommendations for follow-up and therapy of selected post-HCT organ and endocrine complications in pediatric patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)334-347
Number of pages14
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume18
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Financial disclosure: This work was funded in part by National Institute of Health Grants 1R13CA159788-01 (to M.P. and K.S.B.), U01HL069254 (to M.P.), and R01 CA112530-05 (to K.S.B .). The views expressed in this manuscript do not reflect the official policies of the Department of Health and Human Services; nor does mention by trade names, commercial practices, or organizations imply endorsement by the US Government. Further support was provided by generous grants from the St Baldrick’s Foundation and the Lance Armstrong Foundation, as well as by Genzyme, Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, and Sigma Tau Pharmaceuticals. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies and companies.

Keywords

  • Pediatric allogeneic transplantation
  • Pediatric autologous transplantation
  • Post-transplant organ damage

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