Musculoskeletal pain and menopausal status

Sheila A. Dugan, Lynda H. Powell, Howard M. Kravitz, Susan A. Everson Rose, Kelly Karavolos, Judith Luborsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

60 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: The authors examined whether self-reported menopausal status is associated with musculoskeletal pain in a multiethnic population of community-dwelling middle-aged women after considering sociodemographics, medical factors, smoking, depression, and body mass index using a cross-sectional study design. METHODS: Participants were 2218 women from the Study of Women's Health Across the Nation assessed at the time of their third annual follow-up exam. Two dependent variables were derived from a factor analysis of survey questions about pain. These 2 outcomes were Aches and Pains, derived from 5 of 6 pain symptom questions and Consultation for Low Back Pain, derived from 1 question. RESULTS: Prevalence of aches and pains was high, with 1 in 6 women reporting daily symptoms. Compared with premenopausal women, those who were early perimenopausal (P=0.002), late perimenopausal (P=0.002), or postmenopausal (P<0.0001) reported significantly more aches and pains in age-adjusted analysis. With complete risk factor adjustment, postmenopausal women still reported significantly greater pain symptoms (P=0.03) than did premenopausal women. Menopausal status was marginally related to consulting a healthcare provider for back pain. DISCUSSION: This study demonstrates an association between pain and self-reported menopausal status, with postmenopausal women experiencing greater pain symptoms than premenopausal women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-331
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Journal of Pain
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2006

Fingerprint

Musculoskeletal Pain
Pain
Independent Living
Risk Adjustment
Women's Health
Back Pain
Low Back Pain
Health Personnel
Statistical Factor Analysis
Body Mass Index
Referral and Consultation
Cross-Sectional Studies
Smoking

Keywords

  • Body mass index
  • Ethnicity
  • Menopause
  • Pain

Cite this

Dugan, S. A., Powell, L. H., Kravitz, H. M., Everson Rose, S. A., Karavolos, K., & Luborsky, J. (2006). Musculoskeletal pain and menopausal status. Clinical Journal of Pain, 22(4), 325-331. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ajp.0000208249.07949.d5

Musculoskeletal pain and menopausal status. / Dugan, Sheila A.; Powell, Lynda H.; Kravitz, Howard M.; Everson Rose, Susan A.; Karavolos, Kelly; Luborsky, Judith.

In: Clinical Journal of Pain, Vol. 22, No. 4, 01.05.2006, p. 325-331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dugan, SA, Powell, LH, Kravitz, HM, Everson Rose, SA, Karavolos, K & Luborsky, J 2006, 'Musculoskeletal pain and menopausal status', Clinical Journal of Pain, vol. 22, no. 4, pp. 325-331. https://doi.org/10.1097/01.ajp.0000208249.07949.d5
Dugan, Sheila A. ; Powell, Lynda H. ; Kravitz, Howard M. ; Everson Rose, Susan A. ; Karavolos, Kelly ; Luborsky, Judith. / Musculoskeletal pain and menopausal status. In: Clinical Journal of Pain. 2006 ; Vol. 22, No. 4. pp. 325-331.
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