Multimodal therapy improves survival in patients with CNS metastasis from uterine cancer: A retrospective analysis and literature review

Justin C. Chura, Robin Marushin, Anders Boyd, Rahel Ghebre, Melissa A. Geller, Peter A. Argenta

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Abstract

Objective.: Brain metastasis from uterine cancer is a rare event. Consequently, the optimal management strategy is not defined. We reviewed our institution's experience with brain metastasis from endometrial cancer along with the extant medical literature to develop management recommendations. Methods.: Twenty patients with CNS metastasis were identified. Information regarding symptoms, treatment, and survival was collected. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to compare survival data. Results.: The incidence of CNS metastasis was 0.97%. Median patient age at initial diagnosis of endometrial cancer was 62.0 years and 64.0 years at diagnosis of brain metastasis. Most patients initially presented with advanced FIGO stage: 9 stage IVB, 4 stage IIIC, 4 stage IIIA, 2 stage IB, and 1 stage IA. The median interval from diagnosis of endometrial cancer to diagnosis of brain metastasis was 11.5 months (range 0.6-73.6). Median survival after diagnosis of brain metastasis was 2.0 months (range 0.1-39.2). Improved survival was seen in patients treated with multimodal therapy compared to patients who only received whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) (p = 0.0001) or compared to patients who received no treatment (p = 0.009). No difference in survival was seen between patients treated with WBRT versus no therapy. The survival advantage associated with multimodal therapy was also supported by case reports and case series in the literature. Conclusions.: Based upon the data presented along with the medical literature, multimodal therapy appears to improve the survival of patients with CNS metastasis from uterine cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)79-85
Number of pages7
JournalGynecologic oncology
Volume107
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2007

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Uterine Neoplasms
Neoplasm Metastasis
Survival
Brain
Endometrial Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Radiotherapy
Incidence

Keywords

  • Brain metastasis
  • Endometrial cancer

Cite this

Multimodal therapy improves survival in patients with CNS metastasis from uterine cancer : A retrospective analysis and literature review. / Chura, Justin C.; Marushin, Robin; Boyd, Anders; Ghebre, Rahel; Geller, Melissa A.; Argenta, Peter A.

In: Gynecologic oncology, Vol. 107, No. 1, 01.10.2007, p. 79-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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