Multi-proxy record of Holocene paleoenvironmental conditions from Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming, USA

Sabrina R. Brown, Rosine Cartier, Christopher M. Schiller, Petra Zahajská, Sherilyn C. Fritz, Lisa A. Morgan, Cathy Whitlock, Daniel J. Conley, Jack H. Lacey, Melanie J. Leng, W. C.Pat Shanks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

A composite 11.82 m-long (9876–67 cal yr BP) sediment record from Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming was analyzed using a robust set of biological and geochemical proxies to investigate the paleoenvironmental evolution of the lake and its catchment in response to long-term climate forcing. Oxygen isotopes from diatom frustules were analyzed to reconstruct Holocene climate changes, and pollen, charcoal, diatom assemblages, and biogenic silica provided information on terrestrial and limnological responses. The long-term trends recorded in the terrestrial and limnic ecosystems over the last 9800 years reflect the influence of changes in the amplification of the seasonal cycle of insolation on regional climate. The early Holocene (9880–6700 cal yr BP) summer insolation maximum and strengthening of the northeastern Pacific subtropical high-pressure system created warm dry conditions and decreasing summer insolation in the middle (6700–3000 cal yr BP) and late (3000–67 cal yr BP) Holocene resulted in progressively cooler, wetter conditions. Submillenial climate variation is also apparent, with a wetter/cooler interval between 7000 and 6800 cal yr BP and warmer and/or drier conditions from 4500 to 3000 cal yr BP and at ca. 1100 cal yr BP. These data show that the Yellowstone Lake basin had a climate history typical of a summer-dry region, which helps to better define the spatial variability of Holocene climate in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number107275
Number of pages17
JournalQuaternary Science Reviews
Volume274
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the National Science Foundation's Integrated Earth Systems program EAR-1516361 (Morgan, Shanks), EAR-1515353 (Whitlock), and EAR-1515377 (Fritz), the Swedish Research Council (Conley), The Royal Physiographic Society in Lund (to both Cartier and Zahajsk?), and a Swedish Research Council Tage Erlander Professorship (Fritz). The research was conducted under Yellowstone National Park research permits YELL-2016-SCI-7018, YELL-2016-SCI-5054, YELL-2018-SCI-5054 and YELL-2018-SCI-7084. Yellowstone Lake coring was aided by M. Baker, C. Linder, R. O'Grady, M. Shapley, R. Sohn, and Yellowstone National Park rangers. LacCore provided coring infrastructure, laboratory space for core splitting, subsampling, and analyzes including magnetic susceptibility. We thank K. Ljung for his help in the analysis of organic matter and C. Alwmark for assistance with the SEM at Lund University. Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Funding Information:
This research was supported by the National Science Foundation's Integrated Earth Systems program EAR-1516361 (Morgan, Shanks), EAR-1515353 (Whitlock), and EAR-1515377 (Fritz), the Swedish Research Council (Conley), The Royal Physiographic Society in Lund (to both Cartier and Zahajská), and a Swedish Research Council Tage Erlander Professorship (Fritz). The research was conducted under Yellowstone National Park research permits YELL-2016-SCI-7018, YELL-2016-SCI-5054, YELL-2018-SCI-5054 and YELL-2018-SCI-7084. Yellowstone Lake coring was aided by M. Baker, C. Linder, R. O'Grady, M. Shapley, R. Sohn, and Yellowstone National Park rangers. LacCore provided coring infrastructure, laboratory space for core splitting, subsampling, and analyzes including magnetic susceptibility. We thank K. Ljung for his help in the analysis of organic matter and C. Alwmark for assistance with the SEM at Lund University. Any use of trade, firm, or product names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Elsevier Ltd

Keywords

  • Biogenic silica
  • Charcoal
  • Diatoms
  • Oxygen isotopes
  • Paleoclimate
  • Pollen

Continental Scientific Drilling Facility tags

  • YLAKE

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