MRI rotating frame relaxation measurements for articular cartilage assessment

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Abstract

In the present work we introduced two MRI rotating frame relaxation methods, namely adiabatic T and Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF), along with an inversion-prepared Magnetization Transfer (MT) protocol for assessment of articular cartilage. Given the inherent sensitivity of rotating frame relaxation methods to slow molecular motions that are relevant in cartilage, we hypothesized that adiabatic T and RAFF would have higher sensitivity to articular cartilage degradation as compared to laboratory frame T2 and MT. To test this hypothesis, a proteoglycan depletion model was used. Relaxation time measurements were performed at 0 and 48. h in 10 bovine patellar specimens, 5 of which were treated with trypsin and 5 untreated controls were stored under identical conditions in isotonic saline for 48. h. Relaxation times measured at 48. h were longer than those measured at 0. h in both groups. The changes in T2 and MT relaxation times after 48. h were approximately 3 times larger in the trypsin treated specimens as compared to the untreated group, whereas increases of adiabatic T and RAFF were 4 to 5 fold larger. Overall, these findings demonstrate a higher sensitivity of adiabatic T and RAFF to the trypsin-induced changes in bovine patellar cartilage as compared to the commonly used T2 and MT. Since adiabatic T and RAFF are advantageous for human applications as compared to standard continuous-wave T methods, adiabatic T and RAFF are promising tools for assessing cartilage degradation in clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1537-1543
Number of pages7
JournalMagnetic Resonance Imaging
Volume31
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

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Cartilage
Articular Cartilage
Magnetic resonance imaging
Trypsin
Magnetization
Relaxation time
Proteoglycans
Degradation
Time measurement

Keywords

  • Adiabatic pulses
  • Cartilage
  • Magnetization transfer
  • RAFF
  • Rotating frame relaxation
  • Trypsin

Cite this

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title = "MRI rotating frame relaxation measurements for articular cartilage assessment",
abstract = "In the present work we introduced two MRI rotating frame relaxation methods, namely adiabatic T1ρ and Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF), along with an inversion-prepared Magnetization Transfer (MT) protocol for assessment of articular cartilage. Given the inherent sensitivity of rotating frame relaxation methods to slow molecular motions that are relevant in cartilage, we hypothesized that adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF would have higher sensitivity to articular cartilage degradation as compared to laboratory frame T2 and MT. To test this hypothesis, a proteoglycan depletion model was used. Relaxation time measurements were performed at 0 and 48. h in 10 bovine patellar specimens, 5 of which were treated with trypsin and 5 untreated controls were stored under identical conditions in isotonic saline for 48. h. Relaxation times measured at 48. h were longer than those measured at 0. h in both groups. The changes in T2 and MT relaxation times after 48. h were approximately 3 times larger in the trypsin treated specimens as compared to the untreated group, whereas increases of adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF were 4 to 5 fold larger. Overall, these findings demonstrate a higher sensitivity of adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF to the trypsin-induced changes in bovine patellar cartilage as compared to the commonly used T2 and MT. Since adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF are advantageous for human applications as compared to standard continuous-wave T1ρ methods, adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF are promising tools for assessing cartilage degradation in clinical settings.",
keywords = "Adiabatic pulses, Cartilage, Magnetization transfer, RAFF, Rotating frame relaxation, Trypsin",
author = "Jutta Ellermann and Wen Ling and Nissi, {Mikko J.} and Elizabeth Arendt and Carlson, {Cathy S.} and Michael Garwood and Shalom Michaeli and Silvia Mangia",
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T1 - MRI rotating frame relaxation measurements for articular cartilage assessment

AU - Ellermann, Jutta

AU - Ling, Wen

AU - Nissi, Mikko J.

AU - Arendt, Elizabeth

AU - Carlson, Cathy S.

AU - Garwood, Michael

AU - Michaeli, Shalom

AU - Mangia, Silvia

PY - 2013/11/1

Y1 - 2013/11/1

N2 - In the present work we introduced two MRI rotating frame relaxation methods, namely adiabatic T1ρ and Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF), along with an inversion-prepared Magnetization Transfer (MT) protocol for assessment of articular cartilage. Given the inherent sensitivity of rotating frame relaxation methods to slow molecular motions that are relevant in cartilage, we hypothesized that adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF would have higher sensitivity to articular cartilage degradation as compared to laboratory frame T2 and MT. To test this hypothesis, a proteoglycan depletion model was used. Relaxation time measurements were performed at 0 and 48. h in 10 bovine patellar specimens, 5 of which were treated with trypsin and 5 untreated controls were stored under identical conditions in isotonic saline for 48. h. Relaxation times measured at 48. h were longer than those measured at 0. h in both groups. The changes in T2 and MT relaxation times after 48. h were approximately 3 times larger in the trypsin treated specimens as compared to the untreated group, whereas increases of adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF were 4 to 5 fold larger. Overall, these findings demonstrate a higher sensitivity of adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF to the trypsin-induced changes in bovine patellar cartilage as compared to the commonly used T2 and MT. Since adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF are advantageous for human applications as compared to standard continuous-wave T1ρ methods, adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF are promising tools for assessing cartilage degradation in clinical settings.

AB - In the present work we introduced two MRI rotating frame relaxation methods, namely adiabatic T1ρ and Relaxation Along a Fictitious Field (RAFF), along with an inversion-prepared Magnetization Transfer (MT) protocol for assessment of articular cartilage. Given the inherent sensitivity of rotating frame relaxation methods to slow molecular motions that are relevant in cartilage, we hypothesized that adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF would have higher sensitivity to articular cartilage degradation as compared to laboratory frame T2 and MT. To test this hypothesis, a proteoglycan depletion model was used. Relaxation time measurements were performed at 0 and 48. h in 10 bovine patellar specimens, 5 of which were treated with trypsin and 5 untreated controls were stored under identical conditions in isotonic saline for 48. h. Relaxation times measured at 48. h were longer than those measured at 0. h in both groups. The changes in T2 and MT relaxation times after 48. h were approximately 3 times larger in the trypsin treated specimens as compared to the untreated group, whereas increases of adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF were 4 to 5 fold larger. Overall, these findings demonstrate a higher sensitivity of adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF to the trypsin-induced changes in bovine patellar cartilage as compared to the commonly used T2 and MT. Since adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF are advantageous for human applications as compared to standard continuous-wave T1ρ methods, adiabatic T1ρ and RAFF are promising tools for assessing cartilage degradation in clinical settings.

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