Motion perception at equiluminance and the consequences for computational vision systems

George L. Zimmerman, Viet Nguyen

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

When the image of a moving object is equal in luminance with the background, we observe a startling change in both its apparent motion and its three-dimensional position in space. If we use biological vision as a guide for the construction of machine vision systems, this perceptual phenomenon has profound implications. Motion information can be used in a variety of visual tasks such as detection, calibration, guided movement, navigation, and recognition. Human performance at equiluminance suggests that navigation uses motion information heavily and that for recognition, motion plays only a role such as separating figure from ground or grossly defining surface in space. Equiluminant motion perception cannot tell us much about detection, calibration, or guided movement tasks. We demonstrate an adaptive model of motion perception which presents similar equiluminant responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
PublisherPubl by Int Soc for Optical Engineering
Pages401-412
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)0819410268
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993
EventIntelligent Robots and Computer Vision XI: Algorithms, Techniques, and Active Vision - Boston, MA, USA
Duration: Nov 16 1992Nov 18 1992

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume1825
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherIntelligent Robots and Computer Vision XI: Algorithms, Techniques, and Active Vision
CityBoston, MA, USA
Period11/16/9211/18/92

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    Zimmerman, G. L., & Nguyen, V. (1993). Motion perception at equiluminance and the consequences for computational vision systems. In Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (pp. 401-412). (Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering; Vol. 1825). Publ by Int Soc for Optical Engineering.