Mothers’ and Fathers’ Reports of Their Supportive Responses to Their Children’s Negative Emotions Over Time

Jackie A. Nelson, Nicole B. Perry, Marion O’Brien, Susan D. Calkins, Susan P. Keane, Lilly Shanahan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective. Parents’ emotion socialization practices are thought to be moderately stable over time; however, a partner’s socialization practices could initiate change. Design. We examined mothers’ and fathers’ reports of their supportive responses to their children’s negative emotions when the target child was 7 years old and again at age 10. We tested a dyadic, longitudinal path model with 111 mother–father pairs. Results. Significant actor and partner effects emerged: Parents’ age 7 responses predicted their own age 10 responses and their partners’ later responses. Conclusions. Parents’ reported responses to children’s negative emotions during middle childhood are predicted by their own earlier responses and by their partners’ responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-62
Number of pages7
JournalParenting
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2016

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This research was supported by a National Institute of Mental Health award (MH 058144, Developmental Trajectories of Early Behavior Problems).

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