Moral Power: How Public Opinion on Culture War Issues Shapes Partisan Predispositions and Religious Orientations

Paul Goren, Christopher Chapp

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Party-driven and religion-driven models of opinion change posit that individuals revise their positions on culture war issues to ensure consonance with political and religious predispositions. By contrast, models of issue-driven change propose that public opinion on cultural controversies lead people to revise their partisan and religious orientations. Using data from four panel studies covering the period 1992-2012, we pit the party-and religion-based theories of opinion change against the issue-based model of change. Consistent with the standard view, party and religion constrain culture war opinion. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, but consistent with our novel theory, opinions on culture war issues lead people to revise their partisan affinities and religious orientations. Our results imply that culture war attitudes function as foundational elements in the political and religious belief systems of ordinary citizens that match and sometimes exceed partisan and religious predispositions in terms of motivating power.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-128
Number of pages19
JournalAmerican Political Science Review
Volume111
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2017

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Moral Power: How Public Opinion on Culture War Issues Shapes Partisan Predispositions and Religious Orientations'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this