Molecular epidemiology of subgroup C avian pneumoviruses isolated in the United States and comparison with subgroup A and B viruses

Hyun Jin Shin, Kjerstin T. Cameron, Janet A. Jacobs, Elizabeth A. Turpin, David A. Halvorson, Sagar M. Goyal, Kakambi V. Nagaraja, Mahesh C. Kumar, Dale C. Lauer, Bruce S. Seal, M. Kariuki Njenga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

The avian pneumovirus (APV) outbreak in the United States is concentrated in the north-central region, particularly in Minnesota, where more outbreaks in commercial turkeys occur in the spring (April to May) and autumn (October to December). Comparison of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix (M), fusion (F), and second matrix (M2) genes of 15 U.S. APV strains isolated between 1996 and 1999 revealed between 89 and 94% nucleotide sequence identity and 81 to 95% amino acid sequence identity. In contrast, genes from U.S. viruses had 41 to 77% nucleotide sequence identity and 52 to 78% predicted amino acid sequence identity with European subgroup A or B viruses, confirming that U.S. viruses belonged to a separate subgroup. Of the five proteins analyzed in U.S. viruses, P was the most variable (81% amino acid sequence identity) and N was the most conserved (95% amino acid sequence identity). Phylogenetic comparison of subgroups A, B, and C viruses indicated that A and B viruses were more closely related to each other than either A or B viruses were to C viruses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1687-1693
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of clinical microbiology
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2002

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