Modulations in pallidal local field potentials in the systemic 1-methyl-4-phenyl-l, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine nonhuman primate model of Parkinson's disease during a voluntary reaching task

Claudia Hendrix, Filippo Agnesi, Allison T. Connolly, Kenneth Baker, Matthew D Johnson, Jerrold L Vitek

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This case-study characterizes the changes in neuronal activity that occur within the globus pallidus (GP) in the behaving systemic l-methyl-4-phenyl-l, 2, 3, 6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) nonhuman primate model of Parkinson's disease (PD) while on and off dopaminergic therapy. Local field potentials (LFP) were recorded from a scaled 8-contact deep brain stimulation (DBS) lead during a center-out reaching task. Spectral LFP activity and reach behavior were correlated with parkinsonian motor signs and changes in behavior during dopaminergic treatment. Dopamine therapy i) increased reaction time and decreased reach time, ii) shortened the onset-times of LFP synchronization and desynchronization during reaction time, and iii) eliminated desynchronization of the high beta band. These findings suggest that dopamine-induced improvement in bradykinesia is related to a change in the pattern of synchronized oscillatory activity in GP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2013 6th International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2013
Pages1222-1225
Number of pages4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2013
Event2013 6th International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2013 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Nov 6 2013Nov 8 2013

Publication series

NameInternational IEEE/EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER
ISSN (Print)1948-3546
ISSN (Electronic)1948-3554

Other

Other2013 6th International IEEE EMBS Conference on Neural Engineering, NER 2013
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period11/6/1311/8/13

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