Modulating neural circuits with transcranial magnetic stimulation: Implications for addiction treatment development

Colleen A. Hanlon, Logan T. Dowdle, J. Scott Henderson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although the last 50 years of clinical and preclinical research have demonstrated that addiction is a brain disease, we still have no neural circuit–based treatments for substance dependence or cue reactivity at large. Now, for the first time, it appears that a noninvasive brain stimulation technique known as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), which is Food and Drug Administration approved to treat depression, may be the first tool available to fill this critical void in addiction treatment development. The goals of this review are to 1) introduce TMS as a tool to induce causal change in behavior, cortical excitability, and frontal–striatal activity; 2) describe repetitive TMS (rTMS) as an interventional tool; 3) provide an overview of the studies that have evaluated rTMS as a therapeutic tool for alcohol and drug use disorders; and 4) outline a conceptual framework for target selection when designing future rTMS clinical trials in substance use disorders. The manuscript concludes with some suggestions for methodological innovation, specifically with regard to combining rTMS with pharmacotherapy as well as cognitive behavioral training paradigms. We have attempted to create a comprehensive manuscript that provides the reader with a basic set of knowledge and an introduction to the primary experimental questions that will likely drive the field of TMS treatment development forward for the next several years.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)661-683
Number of pages23
JournalPharmacological Reviews
Volume70
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Address correspondence to: Dr. Colleen A. Hanlon, Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of South Carolina, 67 President Street, Charleston, SC 29425. E-mail: hanlon@musc.edu This work was supported by National Institutes of Health National Institute of Drug Abuse [Grants R01DA03661, T32DA007288, and F31DA043330], National Institute of General Medical Science [Grant P20 GM109040-04], and National Institutes of Health [Grants R01DA03661, R21DA041610, P50AA010761, P20GM109040, T32DA007288, F31DA043330, and P20 GM109040]. https://doi.org/10.1124/pr.116.013649.

Funding Information:
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health National Institute of Drug Abuse [Grants R01DA03661, T32DA007288, and F31DA043330], National Institute of General Medical Science [Grant P20 GM109040-04], and National Institutes of Health [Grants R01DA03661, R21DA041610, P50AA010761, P20GM109040, T32DA007288, F31DA043330, and P20 GM109040].

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