Modular mobile docking station design

Casey Carlson, Andrew Drenner, Ian Burt, Nikolaos P Papanikolopoulos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Large scale robotic teams are capable of working independently or cooperatively to carry out a variety of missions. However, for large teams of robots to function for extended periods of time, the individual members of a team must be able to generate or find energy to re-supply themselves. One approach to providing power for a robotic team is to couple larger systems with significant energy reserves so that the smaller systems can be recharged directly from the larger. This paper presents an implementation of such an approach. Here, a modular docking station is given locomotion through the cooperation of two larger robots. The docking station is capable of transporting, deploying, retrieving, and recharging many smaller robots. The kinematic model which will govern the cooperation of the maneuvering robots and will be used to develop control is presented and discussed. The design of the individual bays of the docking station and how they facilitate the deployment, recovery, and recharge of the smaller robots is also presented. The development of this system makes possible a number of applications, including autonomous long-term environmental monitoring and reconnaissance in various locations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006
Pages4722-4727
Number of pages6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006 - Beijing, China
Duration: Oct 9 2006Oct 15 2006

Other

Other2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006
CountryChina
CityBeijing
Period10/9/0610/15/06

Fingerprint

Robots
Robotics
Kinematics
Recovery
Monitoring

Cite this

Carlson, C., Drenner, A., Burt, I., & Papanikolopoulos, N. P. (2006). Modular mobile docking station design. In 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006 (pp. 4722-4727). [4059163] https://doi.org/10.1109/IROS.2006.282263

Modular mobile docking station design. / Carlson, Casey; Drenner, Andrew; Burt, Ian; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos P.

2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006. 2006. p. 4722-4727 4059163.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Carlson, C, Drenner, A, Burt, I & Papanikolopoulos, NP 2006, Modular mobile docking station design. in 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006., 4059163, pp. 4722-4727, 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006, Beijing, China, 10/9/06. https://doi.org/10.1109/IROS.2006.282263
Carlson C, Drenner A, Burt I, Papanikolopoulos NP. Modular mobile docking station design. In 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006. 2006. p. 4722-4727. 4059163 https://doi.org/10.1109/IROS.2006.282263
Carlson, Casey ; Drenner, Andrew ; Burt, Ian ; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos P. / Modular mobile docking station design. 2006 IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, IROS 2006. 2006. pp. 4722-4727
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