Missing checkerboards? An absence of competitive signal in Alnus-associated ectomycorrhizal fungal communities

Peter G Kennedy, Nhu H Nguyen, Hannah Cohen, Kabir Peay

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A number of recent studies suggest that interspecific competition plays a key role in determining the structure of ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities. Despite this growing consensus, there has been limited study of ECM fungal community dynamics in abiotically stressful environments, which are often dominated by positive rather than antagonistic interactions. In this study, we examined the ECM fungal communities associated with the host genus Alnus, which live in soils high in both nitrate and acidity. The nature of ECM fungal species interactions (i.e., antagonistic, neutral, or positive) was assessed using taxon co-occurrence and DNA sequence abundance correlational analyses. ECM fungal communities were sampled from root tips or mesh in-growth bags in three monodominant A. rubra plots at a site in Oregon, USA and identified using Illumina-based amplification of the ITS1 gene region. We found a total of 175 ECM fungal taxa; 16 of which were closely related to known Alnus-associated ECM fungi. Contrary to previous studies of ECMfungal communities, taxon co-occurrence analyses on both the total and Alnus-associated ECM datasets indicated that the ECM fungal communities in this system were not structured by interspecific competition. Instead, the co-occurrence patterns were consistent with either randomassembly or significant positive interactions. Pair-wise correlational analyses were also more consistent with neutral or positive interactions. Taken together, our results suggest that interspecific competition does not appear to determine the structure of all ECM fungal communities and that abiotic conditions may be important in determining the specific type of interaction occurring among ECM fungi.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere686
JournalPeerJ
Volume2014
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Alnus
fungal communities
Fungi
interspecific competition
DNA sequences
Acidity
Nitrates
Amplification
Genes
Fungal Structures
Soils
gene amplification
fungi
Meristem
Gene Amplification
root tips
bags
acidity
Soil
nitrates

Keywords

  • Checkerboard analysis
  • Co-occurrence patterns
  • Fungi
  • Interspecific competition
  • Next-generation sequencing
  • Species interactions

Cite this

Missing checkerboards? An absence of competitive signal in Alnus-associated ectomycorrhizal fungal communities. / Kennedy, Peter G; Nguyen, Nhu H; Cohen, Hannah; Peay, Kabir.

In: PeerJ, Vol. 2014, No. 12, e686, 01.01.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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