Mineral vs. organic matter supply as a limiting factor for the formation of mineral-associated organic matter in forest and agricultural soils

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Physical and chemical interactions between soil organic matter (OM) and minerals is one of the primary mechanisms for stabilizing OM in terrestrial ecosystems. Focusing on OM association with mineral surfaces, this study sought to examine mineral-associated OM from the perspectives of both mineral surface characteristics and organic matter chemistry. The research was conducted at paired-sites under North American Mid-Atlantic Coastal forest and crop production with shared environmental factors. Using carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) 1s micro- X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure (XANES) spectroscopy, we investigated the amounts and types of mineral-associated OM. Mineral specific surface area (SSA) of bulk soil was determined for three conditions: untreated, post OM removal and post iron (Fe) (oxyhydr)oxides removal. Amounts of mineral-associated OM were smaller in the agricultural soil, where greater SSA sourced from clay-sized phyllosilicates and Fe (oxyhydr)oxide minerals did not result in greater OM coverage of the mineral surface area. Although agricultural surface soil showed less abundance of phenolic C, speciation of mineral-associated OM did not differ between comparable horizons. Our results suggest that despite the plow-derived mixing of soil, which increased SSA and secondary minerals available to interact physically and chemically with OM in the plowed layer, the formation of mineral-associated OM in agricultural soil is ultimately limited by available OM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-353
Number of pages10
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume692
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2019

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agricultural soil
Biological materials
limiting factor
forest soil
Minerals
Soils
organic matter
mineral
surface area
Specific surface area
Organic minerals
oxide
Oxide minerals
X ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy
secondary mineral
phyllosilicate
terrestrial ecosystem
crop production
soil organic matter
Ecosystems

Keywords

  • Agricultural management
  • Chemical composition
  • Iron oxides
  • Mineral-associated organic carbon
  • Specific mineral surface area
  • XANES

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article

Cite this

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title = "Mineral vs. organic matter supply as a limiting factor for the formation of mineral-associated organic matter in forest and agricultural soils",
abstract = "Physical and chemical interactions between soil organic matter (OM) and minerals is one of the primary mechanisms for stabilizing OM in terrestrial ecosystems. Focusing on OM association with mineral surfaces, this study sought to examine mineral-associated OM from the perspectives of both mineral surface characteristics and organic matter chemistry. The research was conducted at paired-sites under North American Mid-Atlantic Coastal forest and crop production with shared environmental factors. Using carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) 1s micro- X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure (XANES) spectroscopy, we investigated the amounts and types of mineral-associated OM. Mineral specific surface area (SSA) of bulk soil was determined for three conditions: untreated, post OM removal and post iron (Fe) (oxyhydr)oxides removal. Amounts of mineral-associated OM were smaller in the agricultural soil, where greater SSA sourced from clay-sized phyllosilicates and Fe (oxyhydr)oxide minerals did not result in greater OM coverage of the mineral surface area. Although agricultural surface soil showed less abundance of phenolic C, speciation of mineral-associated OM did not differ between comparable horizons. Our results suggest that despite the plow-derived mixing of soil, which increased SSA and secondary minerals available to interact physically and chemically with OM in the plowed layer, the formation of mineral-associated OM in agricultural soil is ultimately limited by available OM.",
keywords = "Agricultural management, Chemical composition, Iron oxides, Mineral-associated organic carbon, Specific mineral surface area, XANES",
author = "Xiang Wang and Toner, {Brandy M.} and Kyungsoo Yoo",
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AU - Wang, Xiang

AU - Toner, Brandy M.

AU - Yoo, Kyungsoo

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N2 - Physical and chemical interactions between soil organic matter (OM) and minerals is one of the primary mechanisms for stabilizing OM in terrestrial ecosystems. Focusing on OM association with mineral surfaces, this study sought to examine mineral-associated OM from the perspectives of both mineral surface characteristics and organic matter chemistry. The research was conducted at paired-sites under North American Mid-Atlantic Coastal forest and crop production with shared environmental factors. Using carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) 1s micro- X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure (XANES) spectroscopy, we investigated the amounts and types of mineral-associated OM. Mineral specific surface area (SSA) of bulk soil was determined for three conditions: untreated, post OM removal and post iron (Fe) (oxyhydr)oxides removal. Amounts of mineral-associated OM were smaller in the agricultural soil, where greater SSA sourced from clay-sized phyllosilicates and Fe (oxyhydr)oxide minerals did not result in greater OM coverage of the mineral surface area. Although agricultural surface soil showed less abundance of phenolic C, speciation of mineral-associated OM did not differ between comparable horizons. Our results suggest that despite the plow-derived mixing of soil, which increased SSA and secondary minerals available to interact physically and chemically with OM in the plowed layer, the formation of mineral-associated OM in agricultural soil is ultimately limited by available OM.

AB - Physical and chemical interactions between soil organic matter (OM) and minerals is one of the primary mechanisms for stabilizing OM in terrestrial ecosystems. Focusing on OM association with mineral surfaces, this study sought to examine mineral-associated OM from the perspectives of both mineral surface characteristics and organic matter chemistry. The research was conducted at paired-sites under North American Mid-Atlantic Coastal forest and crop production with shared environmental factors. Using carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) 1s micro- X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure (XANES) spectroscopy, we investigated the amounts and types of mineral-associated OM. Mineral specific surface area (SSA) of bulk soil was determined for three conditions: untreated, post OM removal and post iron (Fe) (oxyhydr)oxides removal. Amounts of mineral-associated OM were smaller in the agricultural soil, where greater SSA sourced from clay-sized phyllosilicates and Fe (oxyhydr)oxide minerals did not result in greater OM coverage of the mineral surface area. Although agricultural surface soil showed less abundance of phenolic C, speciation of mineral-associated OM did not differ between comparable horizons. Our results suggest that despite the plow-derived mixing of soil, which increased SSA and secondary minerals available to interact physically and chemically with OM in the plowed layer, the formation of mineral-associated OM in agricultural soil is ultimately limited by available OM.

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