Millisecond catalytic conversion of nonvolatile carbohydrates for sustainable fuels

Paul J Dauenhauer, Bradon J. Dreyer, Josh L. Colby, Lanny D. Schmidt

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Carbohydrates such as glycerol and D-Glucose can be directly converted to synthesis gas products near equilibrium on RhCe/Al2O3 catalysts at residence times less than 70 milliseconds. With the addition of the steam, ∼80% of the hydrogen in glycerol can be converted directly to H2. Selectivity to H2 and CO from D-glucose was observed ∼50% near equilibrium maintaining 2/3 of the carbohydrate fuel value. Autothermal conversion is likely to occur by coupling the endothermic decomposition process with highly exothermic catalytic partial oxidation. By directly contacting carbohydrate particles with a hot catalytic surface capable of providing high heating rates, the solid particle forms volatile organics which flow into a porous catalyst and reform with oxygen from air to form synthesis gas. Deactivation over 20 hrs of operation was not detected, possibly because the formation of char is limited by high particle heating rates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication234th ACS National Meeting, Abstracts of Scientific Papers
StatePublished - Dec 31 2007
Event234th ACS National Meeting - Boston, MA, United States
Duration: Aug 19 2007Aug 23 2007

Publication series

NameACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts
ISSN (Print)0065-7727

Other

Other234th ACS National Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityBoston, MA
Period8/19/078/23/07

Fingerprint

Synthesis gas
Carbohydrates
Heating rate
Glycerol
Glucose
Catalysts
Steam
Carbon Monoxide
Hydrogen
Oxygen
Decomposition
Oxidation
Air

Cite this

Dauenhauer, P. J., Dreyer, B. J., Colby, J. L., & Schmidt, L. D. (2007). Millisecond catalytic conversion of nonvolatile carbohydrates for sustainable fuels. In 234th ACS National Meeting, Abstracts of Scientific Papers (ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts).

Millisecond catalytic conversion of nonvolatile carbohydrates for sustainable fuels. / Dauenhauer, Paul J; Dreyer, Bradon J.; Colby, Josh L.; Schmidt, Lanny D.

234th ACS National Meeting, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. 2007. (ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Dauenhauer, PJ, Dreyer, BJ, Colby, JL & Schmidt, LD 2007, Millisecond catalytic conversion of nonvolatile carbohydrates for sustainable fuels. in 234th ACS National Meeting, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts, 234th ACS National Meeting, Boston, MA, United States, 8/19/07.
Dauenhauer PJ, Dreyer BJ, Colby JL, Schmidt LD. Millisecond catalytic conversion of nonvolatile carbohydrates for sustainable fuels. In 234th ACS National Meeting, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. 2007. (ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts).
Dauenhauer, Paul J ; Dreyer, Bradon J. ; Colby, Josh L. ; Schmidt, Lanny D. / Millisecond catalytic conversion of nonvolatile carbohydrates for sustainable fuels. 234th ACS National Meeting, Abstracts of Scientific Papers. 2007. (ACS National Meeting Book of Abstracts).
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