MicroRNA-Mediated Tumor-Microbiota Metabolic Interactions in Colorectal Cancer

Angelo Yuan, Subree Subramanian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Worldwide, colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths. Recent advances in high-throughput technologies have shown that the gut microbiota may have a major influence on human health, including CRC. Nonetheless, how the gut microbiota interacts with tumor cells in CRC patients is largely unknown. Studies have shown that the microbiota fills in a variety of niche metabolic pathways that the host does not possess. For example, the microbiota produces butyrate, which provides the colon's epithelial cells with about 70% of their energy needs. The typically fast proliferation of tumor cells in CRC patients drastically alters the tumor's nutrient microenvironment. Those alterations correspond to the microbiota composition and functional changes. In tumor cells, a central mediator of metabolic changes is the aberrant expression of microRNAs (miRNAs). In this study, we explored recent insights into metabolic interactions between the microbiota and tumor cells in CRC pathobiology, focusing on the role of miRNAs. These observations support our view that miRNAs may also serve as mediators of the metabolites' effects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-285
Number of pages5
JournalDNA and Cell Biology
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Microbiota
MicroRNAs
Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Tumor Microenvironment
Butyrates
Metabolic Networks and Pathways
Colon
Epithelial Cells
Cell Proliferation
Technology
Food
Health
Gastrointestinal Microbiome

Keywords

  • colorectal cancer
  • high-throughput technologies
  • host-microbiota interactions
  • metabolism
  • metabolites
  • microRNAs
  • microbiota

PubMed: MeSH publication types

  • Journal Article
  • Review

Cite this

MicroRNA-Mediated Tumor-Microbiota Metabolic Interactions in Colorectal Cancer. / Yuan, Angelo; Subramanian, Subree.

In: DNA and Cell Biology, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. 281-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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