Microglial immune response to low concentrations of combustion-generated nanoparticles: An in vitro model of brain health

Cayla M. Duffy, Jacob Swanson, William Northrop, Joshua P. Nixon, Tammy A. Butterick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The brain is the central regulator for integration and control of responses to environmental cues. Previous studies suggest that air pollution may directly impact brain health by triggering the onset of chronic neuroinflammation. We hypothesize that nanoparticle components of combustion-generated air pollution may underlie these effects. To test this association, a microglial in vitro biological sensor model was used for testing neuroinflammatory response caused by low-dose nanoparticle exposure. The model was first validated using 20 nm silver nanoparticles (AgNP). Next, neuroinflammatory response was tested after exposure to size-selected 20 nm combustion-generated nanoparticles (CGNP) collected from a modern diesel engine. We show that low concentrations of CGNPs promote low-grade inflammatory response indicated by increased pro-inflammatory cytokine release (tumor necrosis factor-α), similar to that observed after AgNP exposure. We also demonstrate increased production of reactive oxygen species and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) p65 phosphorylation in microglia after CGNP stimulation. Finally, we show conditioned media from CGNP-stimulated microglia significantly reduced hypothalamic neuronal survival in vitro. To our knowledge, this data show for the first time that exposure to AgNP and CGNP elicits microglial neuroinflammatory response through the activation of NF-κB.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number155
JournalNanomaterials
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2018

Fingerprint

Brain
Health
Nanoparticles
Air pollution
Phosphorylation
Conditioned Culture Medium
Silver
Diesel engines
Reactive Oxygen Species
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Chemical activation
Cells
Association reactions
Cytokines
Oxygen
Sensors
Testing

Keywords

  • Chronic inflammation
  • Combustion-generated nanoparticles
  • In vitro biosensor
  • Microglia
  • Neuroinflammation
  • Pollution

Cite this

Microglial immune response to low concentrations of combustion-generated nanoparticles : An in vitro model of brain health. / Duffy, Cayla M.; Swanson, Jacob; Northrop, William; Nixon, Joshua P.; Butterick, Tammy A.

In: Nanomaterials, Vol. 8, No. 3, 155, 03.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duffy, Cayla M. ; Swanson, Jacob ; Northrop, William ; Nixon, Joshua P. ; Butterick, Tammy A. / Microglial immune response to low concentrations of combustion-generated nanoparticles : An in vitro model of brain health. In: Nanomaterials. 2018 ; Vol. 8, No. 3.
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