Microcytosis, hypoferremia, hypoferritemia, and hypertransferrinemia in standardbred foals from birth to 4 months of age.

C. W. Kohn, R. M. Jacobs, D. Knight, W. Hueston, A. A. Gabel, S. M. Reed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

At birth, 24 Standardbred foals were assigned at random to 1 of 2 groups and were given a placebo supplement (group 1) or an iron supplement (248 mg of iron/treatment; group 2). Foals were given iron supplement or placebo 4 times during the second and third weeks after birth. Hematologic variables and general health were monitored until foals were 4 months old. Mean PCV in foals of both groups decreased during the first 2 weeks after birth, but values remained within adult horse reference ranges. During the first 6 weeks after birth, foal erythrocytes were smaller than adult horse erythrocytes, but foal erythrocyte glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activity was greater than that in adult horses. At every measurement, indices of anisocytosis were lower in foals, compared with adult horse reference values, suggesting that foals have a homogeneous population of microcytic erythrocytes during early foalhood. In 2-week-old foals of both groups and in 4-week-old placebo-treated foals, mean serum iron concentration was lower than that in adult horses. In foals at birth and during the first 4 months, total iron-binding capacity values were above the adult reference range. In newborn foals, transferrin saturation percentage values decreased to below the reference range in foals from 2 weeks to 4 months after birth. When foals were born, serum ferritin concentration values were above the adult horse reference range, but decreased to within the reference range by the time foals were 1 day old. From 2 through 6 weeks after birth, foal ferritin concentration values were below the adult reference range.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1198-1205
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of veterinary research
Volume51
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1990

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