MHC Class I Chain-Related Gene A (MICA) Donor-Recipient Mismatches and MICA-129 Polymorphism in Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantations Has No Impact on Outcomes in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research Study

Medhat Askar, Ronald Sobecks, Tao Wang, Mike Haagenson, Navneet Majhail, Abeer Madbouly, Dawn Thomas, Aiwen Zhang, Katharina Fleischhauer, Katharine Hsu, Michael Verneris, Stephanie J. Lee, Stephen R. Spellman, Marcelo Fernández-Viña

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Single-center studies have previously reported associations of MHC Class I Chain-Related Gene A (MICA) polymorphisms and donor-recipient MICA mismatching with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In this study, we investigated the association of MICA polymorphism (MICA-129, MM versus MV versus VV) and MICA mismatches after HCT with 10/10 HLA–matched (n = 552) or 9/10 (n = 161) unrelated donors. Included were adult patients with a first unrelated bone marrow or peripheral blood HCT for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, or myelodysplastic syndrome that were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1999 and 2011. Our results showed that neither MICA mismatch nor MICA-129 polymorphism were associated with any transplantation outcome (P < .01), with the exception of a higher relapse in recipients of MICA-mismatched HLA 10/10 donors (hazard ratio [HR], 1.7; P = .003). There was a suggestion of association between MICA mismatches and a higher risk of acute GVHD grades II to IV (HR, 1.4; P = .013) There were no significant interactions between MICA mismatches and HLA matching (9/10 versus 10/10). In conclusion, the findings in this cohort did not confirm prior studies reporting that MICA polymorphism and MICA mismatches were associated with HCT outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)436-444
Number of pages9
JournalBiology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation
Volume23
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
This study was partially supported by grant #IRG-91-022-18 to the Case Comprehensive Cancer Center from the American Cancer Society, Allogen Laboratories, Cleveland Clinic Foundation and funds from the US National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) Immunobiology Research Grant Program. The authors acknowledge Michael George from the National Marrow Donor Program Bioinformatics Research Department for his valuable input related to the haplotype frequency analysis. The CIBMTR is supported by Public Health Service Grant/Cooperative Agreement 5U24-CA076518 from the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID); a grant/cooperative agreement 5U10HL069294 from NHLBI and NCI; a contract HHSH250201200016C with Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA/DHHS); 2 grants N00014-15-1-0848 and N00014-16-1-2020 from the Office of Naval Research; and grants from Alexion; *Amgen, Inc.; anonymous donation to the Medical College of Wisconsin; Astellas Pharma US; AstraZeneca; Be the Match Foundation; *Bluebird Bio, Inc.; *Bristol Myers Squibb Oncology; *Celgene Corporation; Cellular Dynamics International, Inc.; *Chimerix, Inc.; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center; Gamida Cell Ltd.; Genentech, Inc.; Genzyme Corporation; *Gilead Sciences, Inc.; Health Research, Inc. Roswell Park Cancer Institute; HistoGenetics, Inc.; Incyte Corporation; Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC; *Jazz Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Jeff Gordon Children's Foundation; The Leukemia & Lym phoma Society; Medac, GmbH; MedImmune; The Medical College of Wisconsin; *Merck & Co, Inc.; Mesoblast; MesoScale Diagnostics, Inc.; *Miltenyi Biotec, Inc.; National Marrow Donor Program; Neovii Biotech NA, Inc.; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation; Onyx Pharmaceuticals; Optum Healthcare Solutions, Inc.; Otsuka America Pharmaceutical, Inc.; Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co, Ltd. ? Japan; PCORI; Perkin Elmer, Inc.; Pfizer, Inc; *Sanofi US; *Seattle Genetics; *Spectrum Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; St. Baldrick's Foundation; *Sunesis Pharmaceuticals, Inc.; Swedish Orphan Biovitrum, Inc.; Takeda Oncology; Telomere Diagnostics, Inc.; University of Minnesota; and *Wellpoint, Inc. The views expressed in this article do not reflect the official policy or position of the National Institute of Health, the Department of the Navy, the Department of Defense, Health Resources and Services Administration or any other agency of the U. Government.

Keywords

  • HLA-B mismatch
  • MICA mismatch
  • MICA-129 polymorphism

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